Gin-soaked raisins

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95%
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Gin-soaked raisins

Post by 95% »

Over the weekend I learned of a folk remedy for arthritis: gin-soaked raisins. Some arthritis sufferers claim it restores their flexibility like the Fountain of Youth. The recipe calls for yellow or golden raisins, not the familiar black ones. You cover them with gin and allow them to soak for 7 days. By that time they will have absorbed the liquor and are ready for eating, a teaspoonful each day.

I don’t know whether to call it arthritis, but I do suffer from various aches, pains, and stiffness in the joints. So I bought a box of Sun-Maid Golden Raisins, put half of them into a large cup, and then poured gin over them until it completely covered them. This weekend they should be ready. There is often a benefit to old home remedies like this, whether because of an actual biochemical or merely a placebo effect.

Have any of you gents tried this remedy? My sister has, and she said, "It's like Santa Claus. You've got to believe!"
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Blue As A Jewel
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Post by Blue As A Jewel »

I wouldn't be surprised if the pain did go away... you're eating gin soaked raisins... :lol:
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95%
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Post by 95% »

I steal a few from the refrigerator from time to time, though they haven't steeped long enough to be effective according to the recipe. They're a decent little snack.
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notthesharpest
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Re: Gin-soaked raisins

Post by notthesharpest »

95% wrote:Over the weekend I learned of a folk remedy for arthritis: gin-soaked raisins. Some arthritis sufferers claim it restores their flexibility like the Fountain of Youth. The recipe calls for yellow or golden raisins, not the familiar black ones. You cover them with gin and allow them to soak for 7 days. By that time they will have absorbed the liquor and are ready for eating, a teaspoonful each day.

I don’t know whether to call it arthritis, but I do suffer from various aches, pains, and stiffness in the joints. So I bought a box of Sun-Maid Golden Raisins, put half of them into a large cup, and then poured gin over them until it completely covered them. This weekend they should be ready. There is often a benefit to old home remedies like this, whether because of an actual biochemical or merely a placebo effect.

Have any of you gents tried this remedy? My sister has, and she said, "It's like Santa Claus. You've got to believe!"
I haven't tried this particular thing myself.

However, gin works for quite a number of ailments. :)

Maybe the yellow raisins work better because their structure allows them to absorb more gin. :lol:
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Post by GollyMrScience »

Yellow raisins - an important source of dietary gin.
-Tom-

What the heck - lets just keep mixin' stuff together till it blows up or smells REALLY bad!!

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95%
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Post by 95% »

One article I read, purporting to be scientific, said that both the raisins and the juniper berries contain anti-inflammatory agents. I suspect there is an interplay between the properties of the ingredients and the nervous system of the person ingesting them. This is where the placebo effect comes in. It is well known that a positive physical benefit can follow from a placebo. The person gets better because he thinks he's going to get better. If the substance actually has beneficial properties such as anti-inflammatories, the placebo effect (I hypothesize) somehow enhances them.
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Post by KAV »

Guy I knew used DMSO and copper bracelets. He was stuck by lightning;entered at his wrist driving a tractor.
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Squire
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Post by Squire »

I can see how this would work.
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Post by JimDandy »

It also works well with olives. :wink:
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Post by Squire »

I was going to say that.
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Leisureguy

Post by Leisureguy »

I regularly add 1/2 tsp turmeric, a powerful anti-inflammatory, to my breakfast oats. More info on turmeric here.
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Post by gsgo »

I had an uncle who swore by a few old remedies one of which was -

1 Tablespoon of Apple Cider Vinegar
1 T of honey
Dash of cayenne pepper

Put into a small coffee mug and add some hot water for a sort of toddy that he said was good for everything.
Good shaving,

Gary
95%
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Post by 95% »

I've heard about apple cider vinegar as a tonic for whatever ails you. The turmeric sounds interesting too - but I doubt curry-flavored oatmeal would work for me.
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Post by Leisureguy »

You can always take the turmeric in a capsule of course. But it's cheaper just to use it in cooking. Most will choose more traditional uses, of course.
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Blue As A Jewel
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Post by Blue As A Jewel »

JimDandy wrote:It also works well with olives. :wink:
:lol: :lol: :lol: - Perfect!
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rustyblade
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Post by rustyblade »

I always thought gin was known as a panty remover. I don't think arthritis and panty removal is something I want to witness at the same time however.
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fallingwickets
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Post by fallingwickets »

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

=D> =D> =D>

:lol: :lol:
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Janus
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Post by Janus »

I know someone you might call gin-soaked raisin - but she prefers "granny". Coincidentally, she doesn't suffer from arthritis.
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95%
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Post by 95% »

Richard, the time will come when panty removal is far from the top of your agenda. Getting into your own pants will be a slow and deliberate process. You won't shop at Wal-Mart any more, because what you need is invariably in the far corner of the store, three football fields away. You'll buy a six-pack of bottled water because a twelve-pack is too heavy to carry. You will address every woman under 50 as "Dear" because she looks so young. The youngsters in your family will buy you Scott Joplin records because they think that's the music of your youth, and your doctor will start using the word "geriatric" with disturbing frequency.
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Post by Tye »

I had a gin gimlet last night. It cured all my aches and pains.

-Tye
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