Lemon Curd

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ShadowsDad
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Lemon Curd

Post by ShadowsDad »

Does anyone on the forum love the stuff as much as my wife and I do? Or do you like it even more?

I love the stuff, my wife does too.

We have chickens and this time of year we can't possibly keep up with egg production from our 9 hens, so we had to come up with a way to use the excess. We pickle eggs to preserve them (I love pickled eggs!) and a year or so ago decided to make lemon curd for the first time. Despite it being incredibly easy to make, it's absolutely delicious.

As usual I found a recipe and decided to make it my way. I call it Lemon Curd On Steroids. It's not for folks who dislike lemon!

I use it on toast, in yogurt, heck, I'm not ashamed to pass the reefer and reach into the jar with a spoon and grab some on a whim. Right now as I write this I'm salivating big time just thinking about it.

BTW, I just got done making a double batch, that'd be 2 pints plus a little left over. It's beautiful too since the egg yolks from our hens are rich golden trending to orange. (from the corn I give them as scratch this time of year)

So does anyone else imbibe of the lemon curd ambrosia?
Brian

Maker of Kramperts Finest Bay Rum and Frostbite http://www.krampertsfinest.com/
Or find it here: Italian Barber, West Coast Shaving, Barclay Crocker, The Old Town Shaving Company at Stats, Maggard Razors; Leavitt & Peirce, Harvard Square
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diggity
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Post by diggity »

Sounds great! Are you willing to share the recipe?
Nathan
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Kyle76
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Post by Kyle76 »

I usually get the munchies when I "pass the reefer," too. Lemon curd, cookies, ice cream. ... Wait, are you talking about the refrigerator?
Jim
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ShadowsDad
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Post by ShadowsDad »

:lol: Yeah, I wrote it but didn't see it! Pass the reefer indeed! That's all I need!

Edit: Anyone wanting to try lemon curd but not wanting to make it, it can be found in the supermarkey near the jams and jellies. At least is in in ours. It's expensive though and I have no idea how good it is. End of edit.

Sure, I can share the recipe. The first one is the original, but for us it was far too tame. You get a bonus, the recipe for Scottish Shortbread which is pretty good too, and a good way to use Lemon Curd. Just put a dollop of curd on top of a piece of shortbread.

Lemon Curd for Scottish Shortbread

by Elinor Klivans

Seeing a jar of lovely yellow lemon curd in the refrigerator will brighten anyone's day. Serve over Thick Scottish Shortbread, or use as a spread for toast or English muffins, or a filling for cakes and tartlets.

Yields about 2 ½ cups.

3 oz. (6 Tbs.) unsalted butter, softened at room temperature
1 cup sugar
2 large eggs
2 large egg yolks
2/3 cup fresh lemon juice
1 tsp. grated lemon zest

In a large bowl, beat the butter and sugar with an electric mixer, about 2 min. Slowly add the eggs and yolks. Beat for 1 min. Mix in the lemon juice. The mixture will look curdled, but it will smooth out as it cooks.
In a medium, heavy-based saucepan, cook the mixture over low heat until it looks smooth. (The curdled appearance disappears as the butter in the mixture melts.) Increase the heat to medium and cook, stirring constantly, until the mixture thickens, about 15 min. It should leave a path on the back of a spoon and will read 170øF on a thermometer. Don't let the mixture boil.
Remove the curd from the heat; stir in the lemon zest. Transfer the curd to a bowl. Press plastic wrap on the surface of the lemon curd to keep a skin from forming and chill the curd in the refrigerator. The curd will thicken further as it cools. Covered tightly, it will keep in the refrigerator for a week and in the freezer for 2 months.

Variations
For lime curd, substitute fresh lime juice and zest for lemon.

Brians Notes:
OK, so when was the last time I ever followed a recipe w/o inserting some of my changes into it? I took the amount of lemon zest to be a suggestion the 2nd time I made it. It was the right thing to do IMO. The lemons I used took 3 of them to give me the juice required, but I used zest from 2 of them. There was absolutely no searching for lemon flavor. Just by chance, 2 of the fresh egg yolks I used were extremely orange, so the lemon curd has that fantastic color too.

We made tiny cream puffs for a party, and injected them with the Lemon Curd On Steroids. Pretty fantastic bite size pieces of pastry just bursting with lemonyness.

It would also be great on a slice of pound cake with some whipped Creme Fraiche. And the really neat thing is that since it's homemade there's absolutely no calories! (If you believe that one I have some oceanfront property in South Dakota to sell you)

When I made Lime Curd it took just shy of 4 limes for the required juice. I used the zest from 3 limes. I’d make it exactly the same way next time. BTW, while the lime version is delicious, we prefer the lemon.

Brians changes:

Lemon Curd on Steroids
This is basically the recipe above, but simplified and fortified with far more zest and it makes the same high quality curd. If you have lumps it's just nasty.

3 oz. (6 Tbs.) unsalted butter, softened at room temperature
1 cup granulated sugar
2 large eggs
2 large egg yolks
The zest from 3 Persian lemons (remove zest before juicing- microplane)
The juice from the same 3 Persian lemons- no seeds

Put all the ingredients in a saucepan and using an immersion blender blend everything for a time, longer than you think you should. It'll be terrible looking, but just ignore that and press on, in just a few minutes it'll smooth out. Then stirring constantly, scraping the bottom of the saucepan, over medium flame over medium burner (or a lower flame if it's your first batch) allow it to thicken. No need to take the temperature, when it thickens it’s @ 170°F. DO NOT leave it alone for even an instant, if you do you could get lumps formed on the bottom of the saucepan. I use a rubber spoonula for stirring and scraping the bottom. Do not let it boil.

If you get lumps after it's thickened from the heat hit it with the immersion blender again, but if you kept stirring and scraping the bottom as it was heating you won't have any.

If you don't have an immersion blender you can use a mixer.

Put it in containers to cool and refrigerate. I don't bother covering with plastic wrap and have never had any problem with skinning over.

I always make a double recipe and get 2 full pints plus a small lidded container.

Note : Persian lemons are the standard lemons we buy in the supermarket in Maine. I suspect they are available everywhere in North America. Not jumbo lemons, just ordinary sized lemons.





Thick Scottish Shortbread (Brians notes mixed in at the bottom)

by Elinor Klivans
Superfine sugar helps give these treats their delicate texture. If you can't find it, pulse granulated sugar in a food processor for about 30 seconds.

Yields 12 squares.
6 oz. (1-1/2 cups) unbleached all-purpose flour
3-1/2 oz. (3/4 cup) cornstarch
1/8 tsp. salt
1/2 cup plus 2 Tbs. superfine sugar
8 oz. (16 Tbs.) unsalted butter, softened at room temperature for 1 hour and cut into 16 pieces
1 tsp. vanilla extract
Lemon Curd (optional)

Position a rack in the middle of the oven. Heat the oven to 300*F. Line an 8x8-inch brownie pan with heavy aluminum foil, letting the foil extend over two sides of the pan.
Sift the flour, cornstarch, and salt into a large bowl. Add 1/2 cup of the superfine sugar and, with an electric mixer on low speed, mix to just blend the ingredients. Add the butter pieces and vanilla and mix until large (1/4- to 1/2-inch) crumbs form, about 2 min. Very gently press the dough evenly into the prepared pan. Don't pack the dough into the pan. Bake until the top of the shortbread just begins to turn golden, about 1 hour and 10 min. Remove from the oven and immediately sprinkle the remaining 2 Tbs. superfine sugar over the top. Cut the shortbread into 12 squares, being sure to cut through to the bottom. Cool completely before lifting the foil and shortbread from the pan.

If you like, serve the shortbread topped with Lemon Curd. (This is a must!)

Brians Notes:
If making this in the food processor there is no requirement to let the butter soften. When processing, the cookie dough goes from the crumble stage, which is what is desired, to the lump dough stage really quickly, so be ready.

The sheet cookie will slightly settle and spread as it bakes, but not as much as you think, so get it right before baking.

When making lemon curd there will be some zest available. Why not add it to the shortbread? It’s worth a try; as is ginger shortbread.

From April ‘98 Fine Cooking 26

NOTE: lemon curd freezes fine and keeps for a very long time frozen!
Brian

Maker of Kramperts Finest Bay Rum and Frostbite http://www.krampertsfinest.com/
Or find it here: Italian Barber, West Coast Shaving, Barclay Crocker, The Old Town Shaving Company at Stats, Maggard Razors; Leavitt & Peirce, Harvard Square
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jww
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Post by jww »

We are lemon curd fanatics (some people refer to it as lemon cheese) and she has been making it for years. The best I have had to buy, we found on the market in Bury, Lancs.

We often do a lemon curd factory in our kitchen for Christmas gifts around the end of November -- it gets a bit messy but the stuff is fabulous.

It's best with some soft Primula cheese on a proper crumpet. Not those poor imitations we can get here in Canada at our grocers - but on a real Wharburtons crumpet -- that is truly the life.

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Post by gsgo »

Lemon curd user checking in, like it on most things toasted or with a nice scone, with a nice cup of tea, of course.
Good shaving,

Gary
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jww
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Post by jww »

gsgo wrote:... like it on most things toasted or with a nice scone, ...
Or straight out of the jar on a spoon ..... :D
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ShadowsDad
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Post by ShadowsDad »

Oh, you guys are making my mouth water, even after I finished my breakfast with a piece of toasted pound cake smothered in lemon curd.

You have me wanting to visit the refrigerator with a spoon again.

They're also good on a homemade English Muffin! Yum!
Brian

Maker of Kramperts Finest Bay Rum and Frostbite http://www.krampertsfinest.com/
Or find it here: Italian Barber, West Coast Shaving, Barclay Crocker, The Old Town Shaving Company at Stats, Maggard Razors; Leavitt & Peirce, Harvard Square
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Post by rsp1202 »

Yes, some Robertsons lathered onto a slice of pound cake and a cuppa Tetley British Blend tea. I doubt the Queen is having a better 4 o'clock break.
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Post by Scrapyard Ape »

All well and good, but can one shave with the stuff? :P
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Post by jww »

Scrapyard Ape wrote:All well and good, but can one shave with the stuff? :P
It's a shaving enhancer - eat it while you shave. :wink:
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Post by Squire »

Lemon curd is also an aphrodisiac.
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ShadowsDad
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Post by ShadowsDad »

And as skin food!

The ladies love it as well. (OMG! WHat have I started now!? ) I mean on the face. :oops:
Brian

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Or find it here: Italian Barber, West Coast Shaving, Barclay Crocker, The Old Town Shaving Company at Stats, Maggard Razors; Leavitt & Peirce, Harvard Square
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Post by bernards66 »

Brian, Well, I like it well enough but I'm not nuts about it, as you and Wendell clearly are, my personal mania in this area is marmalade. I've eaten lemon curd ( and the lime version ) mainly on toast or on Xmas cake at the Holidays. About the best ready made that I've tried was the Wilkins Tiptree version.
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Gordon
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ShadowsDad
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Post by ShadowsDad »

Marmalade is good too!

I've never seen that brand here in the states Gordon. Store bought is all too expensive anyway IMO. What I make in 20 minutes would cost $20 (guesstimate) in the supermarket. Other than my time, I bet I don't have more than $5 worth of ingredients in it.
Brian

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Or find it here: Italian Barber, West Coast Shaving, Barclay Crocker, The Old Town Shaving Company at Stats, Maggard Razors; Leavitt & Peirce, Harvard Square
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Post by bernards66 »

Brian, Wilkin & Sons Ltd. is, perhaps, the premire producer of jams, marmalades, etc. in the UK. They are still family owned ( since the 1880s ) and grow much of their own fruit themselves ( those varieties that can be grown in England like the strain of wild NA strawberries that they use to make their famous 'Little Scarlet' strawberry jam ). Once a year, in February, they get shipments, only by rail, from Spain of Seville oranges and they just make marmalades straight through until they've used up their entire shipment and that's it for the year. Their classic orange marmalades are made of sugar and Seville oranges and that's it, nothing more....about 45% fruit content. Only a couple of top shelf house brands, like Fortnum & Mason, are even in the same league. Their products are very difficult to find here in Tampa but not so in the Northeast where even some of the better supermarkets stock them. Any of their products are well worth keeping an eye out for even if they are rather pricey.
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Post by maskaggs »

Yesterday I was at the grocery looking for red pepper jelly (to go in a recipe I'm soon to post on another thread - outstanding), which I'd never bought before. Being an idiot, I thought "surely it won't be with breakfast jams and jellies." It was with the breakfast jams and jellies. But right next to it was a jar of Dickinson's Lemon Curd. Now that this thread has my interest piqued, is this something worth buying to see if lemon curd is good to me, or should I look for a higher quality product?
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Mike
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Post by paddy »

i am also a big orange marmalade fan. i had it this morning in fact! as well as the wilkin this one is great also:

http://www.theirishshop.co.uk/index.php ... ucts_id=75

marks & spencer do a nice seville orange marmalade also.
Remember: this is all just wasted time and lives talking nonsense to strangers about pieces of metal, hair and chemical compounds.
bernards66
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Post by bernards66 »

Paddy, Thanks for the link. Partridges Thick Cut is another unusually good one. It's not available anywhere in NA per se but very rarely some will show up at T J Maxx ( presumably overflow from their sister stores in the UK ). Baxter's is another one that is unavailable here, so I've never gotten an opportunity to explore their range. Ditto the stuff from Paxton & Whitfield.
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Gordon
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Post by celar36 »

paddy wrote:i am also a big orange marmalade fan. i had it this morning in fact! as well as the wilkin this one is great also:

http://www.theirishshop.co.uk/index.php ... ucts_id=75

marks & spencer do a nice seville orange marmalade also.
Thanks for a tip. I will pop in on a day to M&S for it to try it out :)
Jack
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