Favorite War Movies

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Kyle76
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Post by Kyle76 » Mon Apr 02, 2012 7:57 pm

Squire wrote:Catch 22
Squire, I wish the movie was half as good as the book. I don't think it translated that well to the screen, but the book is one of the funniest ever.
Jim

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ShadowsDad
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Post by ShadowsDad » Mon Apr 02, 2012 9:59 pm

[quote="changabang"]Brian, I think "Pork Chop Hill" was a little scuffle during the Korean War.

quote]

Quite right. My hands were typing but my mind was trying to pick a WW1 movie. The two got twisted up.

BTW, for the Zulu pick, excellent movie!

I absolutely hate war movies that don't portray reality as so many hollywood offerings do.
Brian

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jww
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Post by jww » Tue Apr 03, 2012 6:57 am

Squire wrote:Mike 60 is not old.
:lol: =D>
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KAV
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Post by KAV » Tue Apr 03, 2012 11:35 am

HELP?
There was a brit T.V. comedy about soldiers in WW1. I've only seen bits and pieces, but they ended the series with them all going off to slaughter in the first battle of the Somme.
I've always thought it was a well measured end to a comedy about a rather
grim period of history.

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Post by Thalay Sagar » Tue Apr 03, 2012 2:34 pm

I think it was Blackadder Goes Forth.
Best,
Chris

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Araner
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Post by Araner » Tue Apr 03, 2012 3:06 pm

Another of my favorite war movies is “In Harms Way”.

All star cast, directed by Otto Preminger, filmed in black & white, it even has a scene where John Wayne is shaving with a straight razor; what’s not to like?

Mike

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Squire
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Post by Squire » Tue Apr 03, 2012 4:49 pm

Blackadder commented he had pretended madness to get out of the attack but then realized, "no one would notice another mad man around here."
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Squire

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jww
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Post by jww » Wed Apr 04, 2012 6:56 am

KAV wrote:HELP?
There was a brit T.V. comedy about soldiers in WW1. I've only seen bits and pieces, but they ended the series with them all going off to slaughter in the first battle of the Somme.
I've always thought it was a well measured end to a comedy about a rather
grim period of history.
If we are talking brit-coms, add Dad's Army to the list.

Image

But then, I digress.
Wendell

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paddy
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Post by paddy » Wed Apr 04, 2012 9:01 am

Lieutenant George: But this is brave, splendid and noble...
[Blackadder doesn't react - there's a long pause]
Lieutenant George: ...Sir
Captain Blackadder: Yes, Lieutenant.
Lieutenant George: I'm scared, sir
Private Baldrick: I'm scared too, sir
Lieutenant George: I'm the last of the tiddly-winking leapfroggers from the golden summer of 1914. I don't want to die... I'm really not over keen on dying at all, sir.
Captain Blackadder: How are you feeling, Darling?
Captain Darling: Ahm- not all that good, Blackadder. Rather hoped I'd get through the whole show, go back to work at Pratt and Sons, keep wicket for the Croydon Gentlemen, marry Doris. Made a note in my diary on the way here. Simply says: "Bugger".
Captain Blackadder: Well, quite.
[Outside: "Stand to, stand to, fix bayonets"]
Captain Blackadder: Come on, come on, let's move.
[at the door, Blackadder turns to George]
Captain Blackadder: Don't forget your stick Lieutenant
Lieutenant George: Rather, sir. Wouldn't want to face a machine gun without this.
[they walk into the misty trench, waiting for the off - suddenly there is silence - the machine guns stop]
Captain Darling: I say, listen - our guns have stopped.
Lieutenant George: You don't think...
Private Baldrick: Perhaps the war's over. Perhaps it's peace.
Captain Darling: Thank God. We lived through it. The Great War, 1914 to 1917.
Captain Darling, Private Baldrick, Lieutenant George: Hip hip hooray!
Captain Blackadder: I'm afraid not. The guns have stopped because we are about to attack. Not even our generals are mad enough to shell their own men. They feel it's more sporting to let the Germans do it.
Lieutenant George: So, we are, in fact, going over. This is, as they say, it?
Captain Blackadder: Yes, unless I can think of something very quickly.
[a voice shouts 'Company, one pace forward.' They all step forward]
Private Baldrick: There's a nasty splinter on that ladder, sir. A bloke could hurt himself on that.
[another call: "Stand ready" - they put their hands on the ladders ready to climb]
Private Baldrick: I have a plan, sir.
Captain Blackadder: Really Baldrick? A cunning and subtle one?
Private Baldrick: Yes, sir.
Captain Blackadder: As cunning as a fox who's just been appointed Professor of Cunning at Oxford University?
Private Baldrick: Yes, sir.
[another call: "On the signal, Company will advance"]
Captain Blackadder: Well, I'm afraid it's too late. Whatever it was, I'm sure it was better than my plan to get out of here by pretending to be mad. I mean, who would have noticed another madman round here?
[a whistle blows he looks at Baldrick]
Captain Blackadder: Good luck, everyone.
Remember: this is all just wasted time and lives talking nonsense to strangers about pieces of metal, hair and chemical compounds.

changabang
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Post by changabang » Wed Apr 04, 2012 12:49 pm

Robert Graves would have been proud. Good bye to all that.
James Nicks

merkri
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Post by merkri » Wed Apr 04, 2012 7:47 pm

This probably isn't what you meant, but I'd have to say Fog of War by Errol Morris.

If I could stretch it even further, I'd nominate Dr. Strangelove or The Third Man.

The Third Man is technically after WWII, but it's *right* after the war, when the war is still very much part of the context and environment. That era is completely fascinating to me.

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wenestvedt
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Post by wenestvedt » Thu Apr 05, 2012 7:32 pm

Does the BBC miniseries "Piece of Cake" count? I watched it on DVD last year and really enjoyed it. (It's about British flyers stationed on French soil during the "Phony War.")

- Will

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