I ordered a Canadian barbecue grill

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Kyle76
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I ordered a Canadian barbecue grill

Post by Kyle76 »

My old Holland Grill, at 20 years old, is on its last legs. In searching online for a replacement, I discovered the Napoleon line of grills, manufactured in Canada. I ordered one through Amazon, and I am hoping for a Dec. 26 arrival. This grill includes an infrared side burner for searing and quick cooking, something I've never had before, and also an infrared rotisserie burner at the back. It looks like I'm going to have to pick up some new cooking skills and techniques. This grill wasn't cheap, but it seems well constructed of good, heavy stainless steel, so I'm thinking it will be the last one I ever have to buy. The Holland has been a workhorse, but it's not designed to get really hot enough for proper searing. Anyone familiar with the Napoleon line?
Jim
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jww
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Post by jww »

Never heard of them, but if they are Canadian, how can you go wrong?

I just googled them and I have to say they are beautiful looking grills. Let us know how you get on with it.
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Kyle76
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Post by Kyle76 »

jww wrote:Never heard of them, but if they are Canadian, how can you go wrong?
That's what I was thinking, Wendell! Strong warranty, too.
Jim
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Post by Barry »

A acquaintance of mine has one of these. I haven't seen it in action but a good friend has cooked a variety of meats on the grill. As you know you can really crank up the heat on most infrared grills. Maybe 1500-1800 degrees?My friend was using long tongs while searing lamb chops on the grill and jokingly said the heat almost burned off his arm hairs.
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GA Russell
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Post by GA Russell »

Sounds great, Kyle!

Amazon link, please.
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Kyle76
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Post by Kyle76 »

Jim
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Post by jww »

Truly a work of art. :D
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GA Russell
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Post by GA Russell »

Pretty impressive, Kyle!

I notice that no one has reviewed it yet. You can be the first!
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Post by sgtrecon212 »

Gorgeous grill.
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Post by rustyblade »

In Canada (this part, anyway) we refer to the grill as a bbq. I have a Weber BBQ sitting out on my deck. I looked at a Napoleon, very, very nice, but also very very expensive. I have respect for the charcoal heads, but I love the convenience of my natural gas bbq.
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fallingwickets
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Post by fallingwickets »

use it in good health and since i dont mind cold steak feel free to send some bbq over any time you have extra leftovers haha

clive
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Post by Rufus »

I believe they're made in Barrie, Ontario. I bought a new BBQ/grill this summer to replace my faithful 15 year old Weber, which was eagerly snapped up by my step-son notwithstanding its age. I gave serious consideration to buying a Napoleon because of the positive reviews I'd read about their various models and because they're made in my backyard. After much indecision, however, I bought another Weber Genesis, principally because of how well my previous Weber performed and how durable it is. Sometimes I think I'm a traitor to Canadian manufacturers, especially those in Ontario, who have had a rough few years of it recently.
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Kyle76
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Post by Kyle76 »

rustyblade wrote:In Canada (this part, anyway) we refer to the grill as a bbq. I have a Weber BBQ sitting out on my deck. I looked at a Napoleon, very, very nice, but also very very expensive. I have respect for the charcoal heads, but I love the convenience of my natural gas bbq.
Around here, barbecue is pulled pork, slow-cooked and drenched in a vinegar-based sauce. It's a noun, not a verb. You don't barbecue a steak, you "cook out." The Napoleon is costly, to be sure, but I guess you have to pay up for Canadian craftsmanship. As for charcoal, I bought a cast-iron basket that fits into the grill and holds charcoal for those meals for which only charcoal will do.
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Post by brothers »

Around here we "charcoal" or grille, we don't barbeque. We eat barbeque. Specifically, chicken, beef, pork, and sausage are given the title barbeque when they're slow smoked for several hours. If I make barbeque, I say I'm "smoking" some ribs or brisket or pork shoulder. When they finish, they're considered barbeque. I'm probably not going to ever need another cooker. I'm still using the terra cotta original egg-shaped big green Hibachi Pot that I bought for $20 about 33 years ago from my father in law.
Last edited by brothers on Sun Dec 23, 2012 4:59 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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rustyblade
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Post by rustyblade »

Kyle76 wrote:
rustyblade wrote:In Canada (this part, anyway) we refer to the grill as a bbq. I have a Weber BBQ sitting out on my deck. I looked at a Napoleon, very, very nice, but also very very expensive. I have respect for the charcoal heads, but I love the convenience of my natural gas bbq.
Around here, barbecue is pulled pork, slow-cooked and drenched in a vinegar-based sauce. It's a noun, not a verb. You don't barbecue a steak, you "cook out." The Napoleon is costly, to be sure, but I guess you have to pay up for Canadian craftsmanship. As for charcoal, I bought a cast-iron basket that fits into the grill and holds charcoal for those meals for which only charcoal will do.
To be honest calling it a grill makes sense. Except that the Australians don't say: "Throw another shrimp on the gas grill". :lol:
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fallingwickets
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Post by fallingwickets »

why isnt bbq a verb? Im writing a letter of complaint to the language nazis hahaha

clive
still waiting for bbq leftovers
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Kyle76
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Post by Kyle76 »

fallingwickets wrote:why isnt bbq a verb? Im writing a letter of complaint to the language nazis hahaha

clive
still waiting for bbq leftovers
I guess so that the process of cooking a steak or chicken is not confused with the wonderful finished product of pulled or chopped pork nearly pickled in a vinegar and hot pepper sauce. When you say, "barbecue," you're talking finished product, not the preparation thereof, which traditionally is achieved over a bed of hardwood coals for 6-8 hours with an occasional slathering of sauce. The process is generally accompanied by plenty of man talk (ladies, of course, are inside in the kitchen) and adult libation.
Jim
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Post by Mr. Pinchy »

I fell into the trap of spending big on a BBQ. Hard to keep clean, collects spiders and webs. Damn nightmare.

A simple hot plate with burners for a quick cook after work, and a second charcoal BBQ for the real thing when time permits.

Together costing less than $300
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Kyle76
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Post by Kyle76 »

Just a followup on my purchase: I've used this grill a half dozen times, and I am most impressed. This thing is heavy-gauge stainless, over 200 lbs. worth. It has four burners under the hood, not counting the infrared rotisserie burner at the back. But the best thing is the infrared side burner, which can cook a steak in five minutes with a perfect sear. Tonight, I'm going to try a London broil for the first time on this grill and use the charcoal basket for real charcoal taste after searing. I can say unequivocally, get an infrared burner with your next grill or a separate one to use alongside your current grill. You will eat better steaks than you ever have before.
Jim
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