Sleep Apnea

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mike
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Sleep Apnea

Post by mike » Tue Apr 11, 2006 4:37 am

Does anyone here suffer from sleep apnea? I started using a cpap machine this past week and I'm really struggling with it. I am claustrophobic and this just compounds the problem. Surgery does not appear to be an option at this time since the success rates are not worth the risks.
Mike

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Troy
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Post by Troy » Tue Apr 11, 2006 6:44 am

My mother has the same problem and uses one of these machines. She had trouble getting used to it initially, but now that she has adjusted to it her sleep is much more restful.

I think she mentioned that the noise is a low mechanical sound, and once you get used to it, it can be soothing, like sleeping during a (non-thunderous) rainstorm.

-Troy
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mike
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Post by mike » Tue Apr 11, 2006 7:25 am

Big Ren wrote:. I'm curious if the machine makes a lot of noise?

Ren
Hi Ren. The machine does make some noise, however, I placed it under my night stand and I don't notice it as much. I do need to lose some weight, however my problem is that I have a very small air way.

Until something better comes along, I will attempt to make do with the cpap. As you noted, the complications from apnea can be quite severe.
Mike

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Feldenak
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Post by Feldenak » Tue Apr 11, 2006 7:37 am

My sleep apnea has been reduced since losing weight and quitting smoking. But, man, do I remember walking around during the day like a zombie because I didn't get a restful nights sleep.
-Andrew

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rtaylor61
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Re: Sleep Apnea

Post by rtaylor61 » Tue Apr 11, 2006 7:58 am

mike wrote:Does anyone here suffer from sleep apnea? I started using a cpap machine this past week and I'm really struggling with it. I am claustrophobic and this just compounds the problem. Surgery does not appear to be an option at this time since the success rates are not worth the risks.
Mike,

I was diagnosed a couple of years ago. I also had trouble adjusting to the machine. What helped me the most is about 30 days of sleeping in my recliner. Watching t.v. helped me keep my mind occupied and took the focus away from the machine. The 2nd thing that was helpful was investing in a quality bed. I still don't sleep the entire night, but I do get several hours of quality sleep that has made a huge difference.

Randy
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SteveL
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Post by SteveL » Tue Apr 11, 2006 8:47 am

I don't have sleep apnea, but my mother does. Has anyone ever tried those breathe right nasal strips, as they're supposed to help to some degree?
-Steve

Onion
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Post by Onion » Tue Apr 11, 2006 11:37 am

My wife uses the Cpap machine and it has made a world of difference in her life, she now has more energy and zest for life. It does make some noise, but it is more of a soothing noise to me.... and it beats the heck out of her snoring!!!
Your claustrophobia issue is another thing all together I guess.
I can just say, from a husband who has regained his energetic wife, I am thankful for the CPAP. My wife also loves the energy she now has. There are obviously some downsides, like being tied to a machine etc... but my wife would tell you it is worth every negative to get that BIG positive.

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Post by Onion » Tue Apr 11, 2006 11:43 am

Big Ren wrote:Can someone describe how the CPAP mask works? I know it forces air through to prevent obstructions, but does it go over both the nose and mouth? Does it have a tube going into the mouth or is it similar to a gas mask?

Ren
My wifes mask just covers her nose, it pushes air into the nose.

indyras
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Post by indyras » Tue Apr 11, 2006 12:05 pm

Mike-

I was diagnosed with sleep apnea 7 or 8 years ago. I then used a CPAP machine for a few years, and it helped some, but it was cumbersome and a general pain-in-the-ass to have something strapped to my face all night (not to mention putting a crimp in my love life).

So, in order to try to rid myself of the machine, I resorted to drastic measures... surgery. I had a tonsillectomy, uvulopharyngopalatoplasty (removal of the uvula), and hyoid bone advancement. That helped for about a year, but eventually the tissues in my airway loosened up again.. and the apnea was back.

So, I moved on to a dental appliance designed to hold my jaw in a forward position, thereby keeping my airway open. This has been the best solution for me. The drawbacks to the dental appliance are that 1) it must be custom-made by a dentist who specializes in sleep apnea dentistry, 2) there is some discomfort as you get used to the appliance, and 3) sometimes long-term use of the appliance causes your jaw to resist returning to its full rearward position.

If you want to discuss this in more detail, PM me and we can talk.

Hope this helps.

Rob

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kaptain_zero
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Post by kaptain_zero » Tue Apr 11, 2006 4:30 pm

Hi Mike,

I've been on CPAP therapy for about 2 years now... yes, it was quite the struggle for me to start but I hung in there and now for me at least it's second nature to strap on the mask when going to bed.

I was fortunate that I responded very well to the cpap treatment, the major and rapid improvement in energy and being able to get up in the morning actually feeling rested was the big motivator to keep going.

My unit, a Remstar Auto is very quiet and sits on a table next to the bed. I did find the slight noise it does make somewhat irritating to start so I ended up leaving a desktop computer running in the far end of the bedroom. The faint noise from the computer drowned out the similar noise from my CPAP machine. Later, I switched to having a small desktop air filter running on the dresser, it does the same trick and keeps the air a little cleaner to boot.

When I managed to get my weight down to below 220lbs I found I had minimal problems and could get a decent night sleep without cpap, however that weight has crept back up to about 240 and I'm back on the cpap where I'll stay until I lick this weight problem, once and for all.

Mike, could you elaborate a bit on your setup, type of mask and the way you run your hose etc.? I might have a trick or two for you.....


Regards

Christian
Previously lost, on the way to the pasture. Now pasteurized.

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mike
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Post by mike » Tue Apr 11, 2006 5:24 pm

kaptain_zero wrote:.
Mike, could you elaborate a bit on your setup, type of mask and the way you run your hose etc.? I might have a trick or two for you.....


Regards

Christian
Christian, I have the Remstar Plus ramp and C-flex. I also have the Swift Nasal Pillows for my mask. This seemed to be the least confining compared to the full mask and the nasal mask.
Mike

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kaptain_zero
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Post by kaptain_zero » Tue Apr 11, 2006 6:42 pm

mike wrote: Christian, I have the Remstar Plus ramp and C-flex. I also have the Swift Nasal Pillows for my mask. This seemed to be the least confining compared to the full mask and the nasal mask.
Ok, well.. that's pretty much the same machine without the Auto setting capability which is nice, but I suspect the C-flex and ramp makes it almost comparable. My Auto didn't come with C-flex unfortunatly.

As for the Swift, I've not got access to it through my local provider, the only pillow type they had was the Infinity but I found it very hard to get used to as it goes quite far up the nairs and there isn't enough support from the rubber band headgear to take the strain from hose, leaving it all up to the nose to take the beating... not very comfortable.

You mentioned keeping your machine under your nightstand... I assume you run the hose up under the covers when you sleep? If so, are you having problems with getting tangled up with the hose? I tried that in the beginning but I'm a tosser/turner and I would end up fighting with the hose all the time. My solution was to put one of those 3M plastic hooks on the wall directly over the headboard and made a loop out of thin bungy cord that hangs from the hook. I then run the hose up from the machine, through the bungy cord and down to my mask. This way, I can turn left, right or lie on my back without ever having to touch the hose and my hands/arms never get near it as the hose runs towards the headboard and then up, always lightly suspended from the hook. This also reduces the amount of strain and pulling on the mask and it feels like it's not even there after a while. If I get too far away from my normal position or if I sit up suddenly at night, the bungy cord has enough "give" to let me do that without strangling myself. Of course, rainout is a problem when the hose is out in the open but I just made a hose cover out of some polar fleece which insulates it nicely. Hopefully this will help you a bit unless you've already figured this out! :lol:

Regards

Christian
Previously lost, on the way to the pasture. Now pasteurized.

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mike
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Post by mike » Tue Apr 11, 2006 7:01 pm

Christian, Thanks for the suggestions. I also am a turner so I will try your set-up. I really don't have a problem with the nasal pillows, but I could not tolerate a mask of any sort.
Mike

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kaptain_zero
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Post by kaptain_zero » Tue Apr 11, 2006 8:52 pm

Big Ren wrote:Can someone describe how the CPAP mask works? I know it forces air through to prevent obstructions, but does it go over both the nose and mouth? Does it have a tube going into the mouth or is it similar to a gas mask?

Ren
Ren, there are 3 + 1 basic types of masks, Full face that covers nose and mouth, nasal masks that cover only the nose and the nasal pillow types which don't cover the nose but rather rest up against and slightly inside the naires. The 4th type that I am aware of is rather unique in that it is inserted into the mouth and a part of it goes to the back of the throat behind the tongue. This latter one is not very common as it can cause a gag reflex in some people but it's helpfull to some who have difficulties with the other types.

Nasal masks are most common, the problem is getting good fit to avoid leaks during the night. A common issue with nasal interfaces are that the patients mouth falls open during sleep and allows the air to blow back out and thus loose the effect of the therapy. Some have to resort to a chin strap to keep the jaw closed.

Full face masks avoid this problem and also work for mouth breathers but are difficult to fit as faces vary so much, I have not used one but understand they are not near as comfortable as the nasal interfaces. Some have both, using the full mask when suffering from the cold or flu where there is nasal congestion and a nasal interface the rest of the time

Cpap is mean't to combat the problem of colapsed airways during the night... a common issue such as what I have is when I fall into a deep sleep my tongue slips back into the throat and chokes off the airway, this shuts down the breathing until my blood oxygen level drops so far that my brain is triggered into waking me up to correct the problem, only I don't wake up all the way... just enough to get the blockage cleared, then I fall back asleep, and the process starts over again... in my case this choking occurs about every 60 to 90 seconds when I lay on my back..... Not a good way to get some rest!

For many of us, it's a matter of getting serious about loosing weight. For otherw, the weight is not the cause and there may be nothing else they can do for it. I'm just glad I got diagnosed, even though I had to go outside the wonderfull medicare system... I'd still be on the waiting list if I'd gone the normal route... if my sleep apnea didn't get me first.

Hope this clears some things up.

Regards

Christian
Previously lost, on the way to the pasture. Now pasteurized.

Dave Keith
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best cpap product ever!

Post by Dave Keith » Wed Apr 12, 2006 7:49 am

I am a long time CPAP user and the absolute BEST product ever invented is the mask-less nasal interface marketed as the CPAP PRO.

Their website is www.cpappro.com

Although not usable by all apnea patients, this product has been the best thing I have used and I will NEVER go back to a mask.

The improvement of quality of life that comes from quality sleep is beyond description.

Hope this info helps and if you have any questions give me a PM or an email at: davekeith@hughes.net or call me on the phone at 254-785-2827 (home)/254-977-2682 (cell).
from central Texas, 100 miles SW of Dallas

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Setherd
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Post by Setherd » Fri Apr 14, 2006 11:46 pm

guys I'm a registered sleeptech (RPSGT) at a sleep lab with a long history and great reputation. my dad, uncle, and mother-in-law all have apnea and are using CPAP.
I'd love to answer any questions you may have, BTW I've been in the sleep field seven years now, I've done clinical work and also setup many people at home withtheir new CPAP machines.

FWIWmy favorite CPAP mask maker is resmed, I thnk the swift is one of the best out there now. for machines I thnk respironics with CFLEX is tops.
the important thing is to find what works for you though.

I'll post more later, too tired now :)
Take care,
Seth

"Be joyful in hope, patient in affliction, faithful in prayer."
Romans 12:12


Registered polysomnographic technologist #8067
I work in a sleep lab feel free to ask me any sleep questions you may have, I'll try to help.

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My father's razor
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Post by My father's razor » Sat Apr 15, 2006 7:02 am

Just saw this thread. Have you considered Meditation as a complement to sleep. In other words, sleep less time, in a bed, in a horizontal position, (getting very little REM sleep, because of the apnia) - instead, meditate a half hour at night, and at least an hour in the morning to get your "mind" rest. I have some taped sounds etc which are supposed to bring you down into a very restful state, and I find I can sleep in a bed for 4 hours, then, if I do the meditation, I am bright and perky, no meditation - drag ass time.

I also find that sleeping on the right side, with a pillow under my feet, and a pillow on the right side, to support the body, hand along the body not over the body (to reduce pressure on the heart), is very helpful. I have a hard pillow filled with buckwheat husks rather than a soft pillow, giving the head support.

Hugh
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Post by clownjuggles » Sat Apr 15, 2006 8:17 am

My dad has to use one of these machines every night. the machine he has operates at around 52 decibels it is made by devilbiss. It is about 9''x12'' and has the ability to work as a nebulizer as well. All I know about it is that he has sleep sounder for the first time in almost 15 yrs after he got it. So I strongly suggest the use of one even for a trial.
Peter
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roberev
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Post by roberev » Tue Apr 18, 2006 8:30 am

I have been on CPAP for 2 years now, and it has helped me immensely! I haven't had that constant need to take a nap. With the arrival of my memory foam bed (Tempur-pedic quality, but no Tempur-pedic price), I'm in sleep heaven now!

I used a DeVilbiss 9001 for a year with Mallinkrodt nasal pillows (I think it's now a Puritan Bennett product renamed: Breeze SleepGear), all with great success. After a while I developed a need for humidification; so, I'm now using a Fisher & Paykel SleepStyle 200 with integrated humidification and a Mirage Swift headgear. The F & P machine is quiet and easy to use, and is one of the smallest units you can buy. The Swift headgear is, IMHO, the best interface out there. It's lightweight, easy to put on and take off in the dark, doesn't hurt the inside rim of my nostrils like the SleepGear did, and permits you to plug the hose into either the right or left side of the nasal pillows, which is very useful if you don't always sleep on the same side of the bed. I tried full-size masks, but they all hurt the bridge of my nose.

I found that I too was claustrophobic in the early days, but overcame it quickly. The "ramp-up" feature of most CPAP machines really helps in this regard. Instead of getting hammered with the full pressure right away, the ramp-up feature lets the machine start off low and gradually increase. Hopefully, you're asleep before it hits full pressure. After a while, you'll be able to slap on the mask, hit the "on" button and go to sleep with full pressure from the get-go.

Rob

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Post by msandoval858 » Tue Apr 18, 2006 11:35 am

I tried a CPAP back about 6 years ago and just couldn't get used to it. I can imagine that the quality of the equipment has probably improved over the last few years but thankfully I haven't needed it in awhile. I got in the habit of sleeping on my stomach and for some reason that doesn't cause me to have the apnea issues I had in the past. Like many others I could stand to lose a few (ok more than a few) pounds and that would probably take care of the problem for good.

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