Frank Warner Custom Straight Razor

Use a straight. You know it makes sense.
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xChris
Posts: 445
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 3:16 am

Frank Warner Custom Straight Razor

Post by xChris » Sun Jul 27, 2008 11:23 am

I took receipt of my second custom straight razor. For this one, I commissioned Frank Warner's talents. I was fortunate to get my order in when I did, as he's got several he's working on right now (mine was one of six -- first one completed). As you can see it came in a wooden box along with a certificate of authenticy and a personal note. Here's some specifications for it:
  • 5160 spring steel
  • Anodized Titanium scales with jewelled interior
  • Italian Paela wood overlays
  • fileworked spine, shank, & tang
  • Bullnose (half round), full hollow grind
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I asked Frank to make an 8/8 size razor, as I prefer larger blades (lip loppers, meat choppers, etc.) He wrote back, "I can make you an 8/8 if you really want one. I just scale everything up a tad for that." Well let me state that this razor is really a large piece! Here are some of the dimensions:
  • length (closed) = 7 3/16"
  • length (open) = 11 3/16"
  • blade (length) = 6 3/4"
  • blade (edge) = 4 1/16"
  • blade (width) = 8/8
  • weight = 4.25 oz
** This is the largest razor, according to Frank, that he has made so far. It was so large that he couldn't use the usual zippered pouch he includes with his razors. Instead he customized a wooden box with a fitted, velvet-lined interior for shipment and presentation! **

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Below are some comparison photos to convey the size. The razors pictured below are no less than 6/8 in width (cream/white scales) along with a Wacker 7/8. The razors at the top are a Filarmonica 15/16 and a Henckels Friodur 8/8!

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I had a shave with it already, and it easily met my expectations! Frank has a his own method for honing and polishing his razor's edges. As you can see in the photos, the bevel is quite polished. This made for a very forgiving edge that cut very close without nicks or irritation. His grind, while being a full hollow style, is quite strong; it felt more like a quarter hollow razor with no flexing or "singing" at the edge. I think it is a gorgeous grind too. Note that he also has a taper to the scales -- they're not parallel all the way down. The balance is different with the metal scales, but I was able to adapt to it in the first shave. The shank design allowed me to adjust my grip to accomodate different strokes.

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The final thing I want to mention is Frank's customer service. Frank was always friendly in e-mail correspondence with me. There was great conversation back and forth throughout the time the razor was being made. I liked the fact that I could be involved with the process -- customizing options (e.g., overlays, filework, finishes), asking questions about his maunfacturing methods, general shaving. Frank was also great in asssiting me after I made a poor choice in anodzing color (not what you see here); he worked with me and my inexperience in anodizing to achieve a complimentary hue for the Paela overlays.

I will enjoy having this razor in my collection!
Chris

notthesharpest
Assistant Dean SMFU
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Location: Vancouver, BC

Post by notthesharpest » Sun Jul 27, 2008 11:45 am

If it was any bigger, you'd have to rest the razor on the counter and move your face up and down if you wanted a shave. :lol:

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minderasr
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Location: New York
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Post by minderasr » Sun Jul 27, 2008 3:30 pm

That sure is a beauty! Very nice, congrats.

8)
-= Jim =-

"If your knot flops and splays you are working it too hard."

Jukkie
Posts: 396
Joined: Thu Apr 24, 2008 9:40 pm

Post by Jukkie » Sun Jul 27, 2008 5:37 pm

I love the first one...

I've always had the image of a straight razor with an extended hatched tip on the blade nose.

I don't know why, but I think the style would make and interesting design, and the rounded cutting edge at the end would serve as an ideal trimming tool as you could use a rotating motion to achieve more of a cutting effect in those hard to reach areas, or in those tricky angles where it's awkward to rest the edge of the blade properly. I think it would be much easier to achieve a slightly horizontal glide of the blade by manipulating your wrist rather then using your arm to drag the blade across. Much more dexterity and control when trying not to pull horizontally with too much aggression.

Just my opinion, but I constantly find myself thinking "Man, if only this rounded edge could be used for shaving, this patch would be soo much simpler.

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