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Doing DE before SE

Use a straight. You know it makes sense.

Doing DE before SE

Postby Austinoire » Thu May 26, 2016 6:25 pm

Hi,

I'm new to DE, but eventually want to try a straight edge. ONE DE vet said that there's no progression. I could chose to use SE today if I wanted. Don't know about that?

I know I have no technique, knowledgeable nor hand discipline to be mucking around my neck with the dexterity I believe a straight razor requires. So, DE I felt would be good practice to acquire so much needed experience.

Am I wrong on this?

Also, did my first DE today and it was disasterous.

-Austinoire
Last edited by Austinoire on Sat May 28, 2016 9:38 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Look Ma, I'm wet shaving, I'm wet shaving...
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Re: Doing DE before S

Postby Brutus » Fri May 27, 2016 9:42 pm

If your ultimate aim is to learn how to shave with a straight razor, I do not believe that a safety razor would make a suitable introduction.

Shaving with either one may be considered "traditional wet shaving", but the techniques are different.
You may learn some lessons from a safety razor that will be helpful with a straight (e.g. there is no need to use pressure, preparing the facial skin with warm water and maybe some soap makes for a more comfortable, closer shave, while gels and foams out of a can don't work particularly well), but the essential techniques of finding the right angle and how to stretch the skin are not learned from the differently designed safety razor.

If you want to learn to shave with a straight razor, someone will before long suggest a (Dovo type) shavette and I don't even agree with that advice, as the shavette is a flimsy, lightweight (and less forgiving than straight) shaving instrument that started out as a barber's tool to shave necks and has neither the heft nor the feel of a true straight razor.

If you want to learn straight shaving, do start with a straight razor.
Unlike learning to shave with a safety razor; this will take quite some time (possibly more than 100 shaves before it becomes second nature), perseverance and patience (there is not such thing as a quick, close and comfortable straight shave) and - unlike the safety razor - a straight razor needs more maintenance (daily stroppping, occasional honing) to remain in optimum shape. As a beginner, you will be harder on your razor than old hands and your razor will need above maintenance more often, but this in itself are techniques that need to be mastered to get best results.
It is an arduous path, but most of us will tell you that it was worth it.
There are many good (and some not so good) shave videos that will give you an idea, but in the end you will have to learn by practicing yourself.

If you are unsure whether to invest that much (money, time and effort), there is nothing wrong with sticking to the safety razor that will give you many of the traditional wet shave comforts; but don't think of the safety razor as a learning tool on the path to straight shaving.


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Re: Doing DE before S

Postby drmoss_ca » Sat May 28, 2016 3:29 am

I agree, the two aren't really related skills. If you haven't done so already, you might like to try this read here.

Chris
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Re: Doing DE before S

Postby brothers » Sat May 28, 2016 7:03 am

Brutus wrote:If your ultimate aim is to learn how to shave with a straight razor, I do not believe that a safety razor would make a suitable introduction.

Shaving with either one may be considered "traditional wet shaving", but the techniques are different.
You may learn some lessons from a safety razor that will be helpful with a straight (e.g. there is no need to use pressure, preparing the facial skin with warm water and maybe some soap makes for a more comfortable, closer shave, while gels and foams out of a can don't work particularly well), but the essential techniques of finding the right angle and how to stretch the skin are not learned from the differently designed safety razor.

If you want to learn to shave with a straight razor, someone will before long suggest a (Dovo type) shavette and I don't even agree with that advice, as the shavette is a flimsy, lightweight (and less forgiving than straight) shaving instrument that started out as a barber's tool to shave necks and has neither the heft nor the feel of a true straight razor.

If you want to learn straight shaving, do start with a straight razor.
Unlike learning to shave with a safety razor; this will take quite some time (possibly more than 100 shaves before it becomes second nature), perseverance and patience (there is not such thing as a quick, close and comfortable straight shave) and - unlike the safety razor - a straight razor needs more maintenance (daily stroppping, occasional honing) to remain in optimum shape. As a beginner, you will be harder on your razor than old hands and your razor will need above maintenance more often, but this in itself are techniques that need to be mastered to get best results.
It is an arduous path, but most of us will tell you that it was worth it.
There are many good (and some not so good) shave videos that will give you an idea, but in the end you will have to learn by practicing yourself.

If you are unsure whether to invest that much (money, time and effort), there is nothing wrong with sticking to the safety razor that will give you many of the traditional wet shave comforts; but don't think of the safety razor as a learning tool on the path to straight shaving.


B.


This is quite true in my experience. Just be ready to invest the time it takes to learn what to do and how to do it, money for the razors and all of the stones, strops, and etc., and perpetual work involved with maintaining your edges. It's a lost art, totally worth it, but certainly not everyone's cup of tea. It's more of a passion than just a daily hair removal process.
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