Pronunciation

Thoughts and input on anything related to wet shaving or men's grooming.
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KAV
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Pronunciation

Post by KAV »

After 2+ years I realised a gaping gap in my shaving minutae; pronouning everything correctly. :oops:
So, I don't need linquistic symbols ( I was flirting with a Norwegian girl during most of that class) but a clear phonetic rendition of ( and please add to my short list)
Vie-Long
Plisson
and?
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AACJ
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Post by AACJ »

Add to that:

Muhle
Tabac
Jagger
Art


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M6Classic
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Post by M6Classic »

Plee-sohn.

vee-longue (half way twixt long and lung).
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druphus
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Post by druphus »

A bit off topic (but not totally). The following link takes you to a website where you can hear a French speaker actually pronouncing the names of - mostly French - fragrances. It quite a "hoot" and if you delve into the archieves you get the french pronunciation of most everything out there!

http://fragnameoftheday.blogspot.com/

As far as Plisson, Vie-Long, Muhle, Tabac, and Jagger go, I'm thinking you need to default to the native language (i.e French, Spanish, German, German, and British English)
Regards,
Andy
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KAV
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Post by KAV »

I got in a fight with a english TA in College. This twit announced that LePetit Prince was the only major work of anthony the saint exprey :roll:
I went into a vigorous oratory explaining Antoine de Zuuupery was the'Joseph Conrad of the Air' and he was an idiot.
Pronunciation is one area where the adage " it is better to remain silent and thought an idiot than to speak and confirm it." :lol:
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Post by KAV »

Merci Beaucoup for all the correct renditions given and coming.
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Post by LouisIII »

Muhle as in Mule, Tabac as in T-back, Jagger as in Edwin as in Mick. And pronounce Plisson as Plisson as in Plyson - Plee-SON sounds like an English person trying to do a French accent. Thats not good.
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Post by ShadowsDad »

I heard a video where a German gent from the Muhle company pronounced it Mew-lah. Slight empasis on the first syllable. That's one that someone could have problems with since it's not really something an American would ever see and try to pronounce in the USA.

Hey, we're American (or at least I am), and speak American English. Close is close enough IMO. If I was trying to make sense to someone from Spain, then maybe the Spanish pronounciation of Vie-Long would be called for but for me just reading the words and making the American sounds works fine for me. Same goes for Semogue, and the others you mentioned. BTW, if I was trying to make sense to someone from Spain, they better speak English, 'cause I only know enough Spanish to get into trouble and not enough to make bail.

Maybe I'm an ugly American, but I just sound it out using American dialect. Now Muhle, that's different, try sounding that out...way too many possibilities if one doesn't know a little German.

One thing I've learned with the advent of the internet... the written word has no accent. Just spell it correctly and the person on the other side of the monitor understands perfectly and in his dialect. That has even been recognized by some software tech services too (Trend Micro specifically). We may not understand the gent from India if he speaks to us, but when he's connected to the computer, working on it remotely, and we're communicating by typing, his English is perfectly understandable as long as he can spell. By golly, when I read it he even writes in the dialect that I use! :wink:
Brian

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Or find it here: Italian Barber, West Coast Shaving, Barclay Crocker, The Old Town Shaving Company at Stats, Maggard Razors; Leavitt & Peirce, Harvard Square
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Post by KAV »

I was having a vintage Walsall made hunting saddle looked over by a saddler born and trained in-Walsall.
Za Za Von Arnstein goosestepped in demanding her sidesaddle be rebuilt CORRECTLY. She had a Tennessee Walker.
It seems the girth strap buckle was on THE WRONG SIDE. He smiled and agreed to the modification.
After she left I asked ' Didn't they install the buckle on the offside so the grooms wouldn't be groping between meladie's limbs?'
He chuckled and said 'Za Za is no lady.You know your saddles and I want to buy yours.' He did;2x what I paid because nobody knew what it was.
Sometimes truly 'The devil is in the details'
I want to know the details. :wink:
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druphus
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Post by druphus »

ShadowsDad wrote:...for me just reading the words and making the American sounds works fine for me...:wink:
Perhaps, but I still cringe whenever I hear the beautiful French Notre Dame pronounced as done here in the United States.

Also, the idiosyncrasies of English make "sounding it out" less than perfect (i.e. "push" and "lush"?) to pick but one of many examples :)
Regards,
Andy
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ShadowsDad
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Post by ShadowsDad »

Yeah, I got that KAV. About the details. No big deal. That's what makes the world go 'round and makes the 'net interesting.
Brian

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Or find it here: Italian Barber, West Coast Shaving, Barclay Crocker, The Old Town Shaving Company at Stats, Maggard Razors; Leavitt & Peirce, Harvard Square
Esoteric83
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Post by Esoteric83 »

Cella? - Ch-ella or Se-lla

Same question for Acca Kappa.
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numcks
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Post by numcks »

How about Semogue?
Cheers,
Mike
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Post by LouisIII »

Esoteric83 wrote:Cella? - Ch-ella or Se-lla

Same question for Acca Kappa.
Chella.
numcks wrote:How about Semogue?
Believe it or not, I think its correclty pronounced 'Smog'. :shock: I think of it as sounding like brogue.
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Post by harper »

The language mavens say that the pronounciation of the country of origin is the preferred usage. If the original is too difficult, it is acceptable to use whatever is used where you live but don't expect it to necessarily be understood if you go to the country where the name originates. Hermes may be pronounced Her Mees in English but in French it is AIR MES and as already pointed out Muhle is MOOU LEH (there is an umlaut over the U in German); since English does not use an umlaut the English approximation is eu as in the name Mueller ... but eu in German is pronounced as a sound approximating oy. And that is one of the reasons why the name Rolex was invented ... a made up name easy to say in a lot of languages ... Lexus and Acura were created for the same reason. So is Swatch which stands for Swiss Watch.
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Post by Squire »

I reserve the right to pronounce everything in my deep Southern Drawl which my friend Jonathan, a London Barrister, calls "delightfully Magnolia scented".
Regards,
Squire
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Post by m3m0ryleak »

My formative years growing up in "Charm City" in "The Free State" had interesting phrases descend on my young ears such as "wrench 'em out in the zinc with some wudder". Translation = rinses them out in the sink with some water. :roll:

Sorry, no intent to thread hijack.
Tony

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KAV
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Post by KAV »

Language is rich and always changing. Few linquists have the ability to replicate
native accents. I still hold it is worthwhile to be aware of the correct pronunciation.
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Post by CMur12 »

Every dialect is correct within its own paradigm, though I agree that it is useful to know the standard dialect.

In our own (US) case, I don't see this as correct and incorrect English. I see it as standard and non-standard, as both are correct.

I agree with Chris that language is rich and always changing. This means, of course, that by the time we formulate what is standard, the formula is already out of date.

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Post by Squire »

So in my last few months of active service I was stationed at Fort Sam in San Antonio where I fell in with a bunch of Chicanos who endeavored to teach me Spanish. It was a good while later before I discovered all they taught me were cuss words.
Regards,
Squire
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