Probably not the healthiest, but good

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Rufus
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Joined: Thu Apr 19, 2007 2:25 pm
Location: Greater Toronto Area

Re: Probably not the healthiest, but good

Post by Rufus » Thu Oct 17, 2019 6:46 am

The closest I come to custard at home is the tin of a Bird’s Custard Powder my wife keeps in the larder. I save the creme brûlée, creme caramel, soufflés, etc for dining out.
Bryan

EL Alamein
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Joined: Thu Jul 13, 2006 7:55 pm

Re: Probably not the healthiest, but good

Post by EL Alamein » Thu Oct 17, 2019 6:15 pm

drmoss_ca wrote:
Thu Oct 17, 2019 4:13 am
Amazingly, there was always one kid at each table who wanted the skin. Thick and chewy and nasty as it was. My school custard came in four varieties, the pale yellow stuff being commonest, but occasionally it would be chocolate, pink, or white.

Whilst we talk of fake custard, I'll note that the tinned custard powder requires the use of milk and sugar to make, and it will mean washing a pan. However, you get to control the amount of sugar. Not available in Canada, but easily found in the UK, is an instant version: just add boiling water and it's done. This is a bright yellow and sickly sweet, being a cartoon version of the real thing (pacé, you French*) for idiots unable to go beyond the boiling of a kettle. A good example of the weaponization of sugar by the prepared food industry.

*Of course, crème anglaise can be made with eggs, milk and sugar, and once you get a feel for the many forms of custard that can be made with these ingredients by varying proportions or whipping the egg whites, you enter the splendid world of baked custards, creme caramel, soufflés etc.
Mmmm, yes, creme anglaise and such. Made it many times and now in the mood to do it again.

My waistline says you should be banned! But my heart knows different.

Chris

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drmoss_ca
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Re: Probably not the healthiest, but good

Post by drmoss_ca » Fri Oct 18, 2019 3:52 am

Yes, there's a certain unfairness in the fact that one can learn to cook from scratch, from basic ingredients, nothing pre-prepared, frozen, no additives, colourings, trans-fats, HFCS. And then you get fat. Despite the 'healthy' diet where you know every ingredient. Despite the fact that meat is something you eat once a month if lucky. You get friggin' fat.

I suppose food has to be something enjoyed not for itself, but only because you are hungry, and then in barely sufficient amounts. Oh well, looks like I'll be starting my special six-month weight loss regime next month.

C.
"Je n'ai pas besoin de cette hypothèse."
Pierre-Simon de Laplace

EL Alamein
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Joined: Thu Jul 13, 2006 7:55 pm

Re: Probably not the healthiest, but good

Post by EL Alamein » Fri Oct 18, 2019 6:09 pm

Yep, modern problems.

Chris

Xring3
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Joined: Fri Sep 27, 2019 6:05 am

Re: Probably not the healthiest, but good

Post by Xring3 » Sun Nov 17, 2019 3:14 pm

fallingwickets wrote:
Mon Oct 14, 2019 3:53 am
I never thought i would eat things like biscuits and gravy, but when i go down to SC im at the wafflehouse or similar nearly every morning doing just that :shock: :shock: :shock: :shock:

btw, a $1 tip is a bit stingy :D :D /jk

clive
The dollar tip may seem stingy to you but, in that part of the country it’s generous.

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