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Burgundy mushrooms

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Burgundy mushrooms

Postby ShadowsDad » Thu Jul 03, 2014 11:22 pm

OK, so we can make artisan bread and who can't cook meat? Do you need a side to go with that meat and bread? If you like mushrooms you will love this recipe.

I made this tonight and it's simply fantastic. If you can boil water you can make this.

>>>>>>>>>>click here<<<<<<<<<<<

I didn't add the additional water called for in the recipe. If one truly simmers the 'shrooms it's not required. Boil them and maybe. Keep an eye on the level of liquid.

It would be fantastic as a side with a grilled steak and a salad and the no knead artisan loaf. Don't afraid to sop up the 'shroom sauce with the bread. It's delicious, plus your B vitamins contained in the mushrooms are in the sauce, so sop it up!

It also freezes nicely so don't balk at the amounts, plus it cooks down a bit in volume.

The recipe says any red wine will work. I suggest sticking to the burgundy. It need not be French burgundy however. I used Gallo.

There is no misprint in the recipe at the link. It really needs all that cooking time. But it's at a simmer, not a boil.

Want to cut back on the salt? Use MBT no salt packets instead of the bouillon. Too, the recipe, as is, would work just as well with the 4# suggested, or as many as 6# of mushrooms.

That has to be a record for the number of one sentence paragraphs in one thread. :D
Brian

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Re: Burgundy mushrooms

Postby drmoss_ca » Sun Aug 03, 2014 9:06 am

A small bit of trivia that might help some. Mushrooms, especially young ones, contain a sugar called trehalose. This is normally split up by an enzyme in your gut called trehalase. Some people lack it, just as some lack lactase and can't handle lactose. I'm one of them. Feed me mushrooms and it isn't pretty (D & V all night).

BUT, experience has shown me that I am fine with truffles (great, they are rare and expensive) and also with morels. I can buy dried morel mushrooms in big bags from this place and they can add flavour and umami to anything, which is very helpful when cooking for a vegetarian like my boss.

Chris
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Re: Burgundy mushrooms

Postby das234 » Tue Oct 20, 2015 6:32 pm

Ooh. Now I kind of want some mushrooms along with the bacon wrapped chicken skewers.

Or I guess I could do both and make coq au vin.
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Re: Burgundy mushrooms

Postby fallingwickets » Wed Oct 21, 2015 3:29 am

Brian, the recipe sounds good,,,,unfortunately, the link you provided doesn't open (for me anyway)

thanks

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Re: Burgundy mushrooms

Postby ShadowsDad » Wed Oct 21, 2015 4:26 am

This should help.

Burgundy mushrooms

Description: The best mushrooms you've ever tasted.

Note: cooking time is NOT a typo

Ingredients
4 pounds White Button Mushrooms
2 sticks Butter
1-« teaspoon Worcestershire Sauce
4 cups Burgundy Wine (other Reds Will Work)
1 teaspoon Freshly Ground Black Pepper
2 cups Boiling Water
4 whole Chicken Bouillon Cubes
4 whole Beef Bouillon Cubes
1 teaspoon Dill Seed
5 cloves Garlic, Peeled
2 teaspoons Salt

Preparation
Thoroughly wash the mushrooms and throw them into a large stockpot. Add all the remaining
ingredients except the salt. Stir to combine.

Bring the mixture to a boil over medium-high heat. Reduce heat to low and simmer, covered, for six hours.

Remove the lid, then continue cooking, uncovered, for three hours.

Add salt to taste at the end if desired. The mushrooms will be very dark in color. Simmer until
needed. Server straight from the pot or in a serving bowl. Dip crusty bread in the juice yum!

Mushrooms keep for days in the fridge. You'll love em!

(They freeze good too)
Brian

Maker of Kramperts Finest Bay Rum and Frostbite http://www.krampertsfinest.com/
Or find it here: Italian Barber, West Coast Shaving, Barclay Crocker, The Old Town Shaving Company at Stats, Maggard Razors; Leavitt & Peirce, Harvard Square
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Re: Burgundy mushrooms

Postby Squire » Wed Oct 21, 2015 5:14 am

Brian I've done much the same thing with the recipe essentially cut in half (two pounds of mushrooms) and simmered for three hours. My twist is to use no butter in the simmering liquid, rather at the end of cooking I make a roux with butter and flour then add the liquid to make a sauce.
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Re: Burgundy mushrooms

Postby fallingwickets » Thu Oct 22, 2015 4:04 am

Recipe sounds good, but as a bit of an energy nut there is no way Im burning gas/electricity for 9 hours to make mushrooms.....next time you make them, please save a few for a fedex package lol

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Re: Burgundy mushrooms

Postby ShadowsDad » Thu Oct 22, 2015 6:49 am

Interesting variation Squire. I'll need to try it next time.

Clive, if you're concerned about energy, figure out what it costs to keep a lidded pot at a low simmer for that time. I had the same concern regarding an electric smoker that I had to run for 10-12 hours many years ago. At the time an electrician was on site and I mentioned the concern to him. He did the mental math and told me that it cost well under $.25 for the entire operation (I seem to remember $.13). But that was figuring the "burner" at full draw and it wasn't being used at that level of consumption. Cooking at home isn't a huge energy waster, and one needs to eat; hopefully something more than a cold hot dog. Now buying restaurant food, that is a HUGE energy waster. Why? the fryalator is running whether or not anyone has ordered anything that needs it, the griddle is hot, so is the pasta water, ovens, etc, etc. The entire kitchen is running just waiting for orders whether or not it's needed. It has to be otherwise an order would take 2 hours to fill, most of that time waiting for things to come up to heat. Plus the lighting and everything else (cooling/heating) draws lots of juice whether or not the establishment is full of people.

Since we have a PV solar system and one needs to know the energy hogs when one makes ones own electricity, most energy is consumed in cooling and heating. Most everything else are small users. Another large consumption of energy are the wall warts that are constantly pulling a load and doing nothing but waiting for whatever appliance it's connected to be turned on. I include instant on TVs and such in that. They don't individually use much, but collectively and since they are using juice 24/7, even while we sleep, it adds up. Another big user are our home computers. I never shut mine off, and even when it sleeps it's using juice since basically it's another instant on appliance. Cooking at home should be the least of the concern IMO, even when keeping a pot at a low simmer for hours. Just trying to put it into perspective so that you can enjoy life and cut back where cutting back will actually do some good. One can get myopic regarding pennies and not see the dollars. I could get far more in depth, such as the energy required to make the stuff that consumes the energy, and the fact that an electrical utility wastes about 50% of what they generate before it gets sent to the consumer .

One needs to eat, and good food is much better and more appealing, a least to me, than a cold hot dog.

BTW, I'm not suggesting that you not eat at restaurants, throw out your refrigerator and A/C, or sit in the cold. I was just pointing out that life requires us to consume energy, and some places it can be cut back and other places it makes life worth living, just not in those words. But in the end we all live our own lives.
Brian

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Or find it here: Italian Barber, West Coast Shaving, Barclay Crocker, The Old Town Shaving Company at Stats, Maggard Razors; Leavitt & Peirce, Harvard Square
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Re: Burgundy mushrooms

Postby fallingwickets » Fri Oct 23, 2015 4:52 am

than a cold hot dog.


my fav morning snack :shock: :D

btw, i totally agree with you, however, for me personally Im not investing 9 hours in mushrooms, no matter how magnificent they are. As an aside, I'm a huge crock pot fan. A whole meal simmering for 9 hours yes. One side dish; no

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Re: Burgundy mushrooms

Postby Squire » Fri Oct 23, 2015 5:56 am

Hmm, crock pot, that's an idea I hadn't thought of.
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Re: Burgundy mushrooms

Postby ShadowsDad » Fri Oct 23, 2015 11:26 am

The problem with a crockpot when making the original recipe would be that the lid is kept off to concentrate the flavors and reduce the liquids. A crockpot doesn't have enough heat output to do that effectively.
Brian

Maker of Kramperts Finest Bay Rum and Frostbite http://www.krampertsfinest.com/
Or find it here: Italian Barber, West Coast Shaving, Barclay Crocker, The Old Town Shaving Company at Stats, Maggard Razors; Leavitt & Peirce, Harvard Square
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Re: Burgundy mushrooms

Postby Squire » Fri Oct 23, 2015 1:29 pm

Quite so Brian, I can reduce any excess liquid in the sauce pan.
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