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Sea Pie

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Sea Pie

Postby drmoss_ca » Mon Dec 21, 2015 4:51 pm

Anyone who has read the Aubrey/Maturin series has come across this dish, although it is never described. Apparently it originated in France as Six Pâtes - six pastries - and was a multi-layered meat pie. In Quebec it began to be spelled phonetically as cipaille, and was adopted by the Brits as Sea Pie. Here's a fishy version, using mashed potato instead of all that pastry.

Line a greased oven dish with mashed potato. If you like to use the instant sort go for the herbed or garlic kind. Then fill with layers of various kinds of fish, with peas and a parsley/onion sauce.* Here's my first layer, with smoked cod:

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and with some peas and some sauce:

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Now with haddock on top of that:

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Then peas again, some more sauce and some more smoked cod:

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Then all the rest of the sauce:

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And a lid of more mashed potato:

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Sprinkle some parsley and black pepper on top (I would say cheese, but my son doesn't like it and I made this for him):

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Have some asparagus ready to steam - it will take 10 minutes only:

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Bake for 20 minutes at 425ºF, then give it 4-5 minutes under the grill:

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and serve (messy, but good!):

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*the sauce is easy. Melt a knob of butter in a pan over a low heat. Sprinkle two teaspoons cornflour through a fine sieve, mixing it as you go. Keep stirring or you get lumps. If you get behind, take the pan off the heat and work the cornflour into the butter. Once done, slowly add a cup of whole milk, just a bit at a time and keep stirring. Once all ingredients are in and mixed with no lumps you have made your first roux sauce!. Then add one small onion, finely chopped, and a handful of fresh chopped parsley, or 1/3 cup dried parsley (I used parsley from the garden that I dehydrated and it's still green but crumbly and dry). Keep stirring as the flour cooks. You can add a few drips of milk if too thick, or some more sifted cornflour if it doesn't thicken. If you didn't use garlicky mashed potato, some garlic flakes can go in now, and if feeling decadent replace some of the volume of milk with white wine. Once cooked (it loses the floury taste) take it off the heat and spoon it into the sea pie as you build it.

Chris
"Je n'ai pas besoin de cette hypothèse."
Pierre-Simon de Laplace
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Re: Sea Pie

Postby pausted » Mon Dec 21, 2015 6:31 pm

Ok Chris, it looks great and I intend to make it. One question. How much is a "knob" of butter? :)
Best regards,

Basil
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Re: Sea Pie

Postby ShadowsDad » Mon Dec 21, 2015 8:15 pm

Looks good! I'd love it but the wife wouldn't just as strongly as I would like it. No way that I'd ever convince her to do more than smell it just by being in the same building.

Chris do you like Finnan Haddie? (sorry if we've discussed it previously) I will cook it for myself but few folks in Maine will touch it and my wife definitely won't. Maybe coastal Maine eats it.
Brian

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Re: Sea Pie

Postby drmoss_ca » Tue Dec 22, 2015 3:43 am

pausted wrote:Ok Chris, it looks great and I intend to make it. One question. How much is a "knob" of butter? :)


Well, that depends on your knob! Too much or too little just means adding more or less cornflour, and then more or less milk. You're always making a sauce as you go along and judging the thickness and adjusting quantities so it ends up right. I used a 1/4 cup knob.

Chris
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Re: Sea Pie

Postby drmoss_ca » Tue Dec 22, 2015 3:44 am

ShadowsDad wrote:Looks good! I'd love it but the wife wouldn't just as strongly as I would like it. No way that I'd ever convince her to do more than smell it just by being in the same building.

Chris do you like Finnan Haddie? (sorry if we've discussed it previously) I will cook it for myself but few folks in Maine will touch it and my wife definitely won't. Maybe coastal Maine eats it.


Always happy to have smoked fish - generally I abuse it by making kedgeree with it.

C.
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Re: Sea Pie

Postby pausted » Wed Dec 23, 2015 7:43 am

drmoss_ca wrote:
pausted wrote:Ok Chris, it looks great and I intend to make it. One question. How much is a "knob" of butter? :)


Well, that depends on your knob! Too much or too little just means adding more or less cornflour, and then more or less milk. You're always making a sauce as you go along and judging the thickness and adjusting quantities so it ends up right. I used a 1/4 cup knob.

Chris

Thank you. Now I understand. I thought that maybe a knob was a specific amount.
Best regards,

Basil
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Re: Sea Pie

Postby ShadowsDad » Wed Dec 23, 2015 8:29 am

That's a different smoked haddock recipe for sure Chris. I had to google it as I'd never heard of it before. No doubt I'd like it. I'd have to lie to the wife as to what it was though. Her mind simply can't handle fish of any sort.
Brian

Maker of Kramperts Finest Bay Rum and Frostbite http://www.krampertsfinest.com/
Or find it here: Italian Barber, West Coast Shaving, Barclay Crocker, The Old Town Shaving Company at Stats, Maggard Razors; Leavitt & Peirce, Harvard Square
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Re: Sea Pie

Postby TheMonk » Wed Dec 23, 2015 9:43 am

Oh my, that looks scrumptious!
David

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