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Breakfast

Postby ShadowsDad » Thu Jul 06, 2017 6:50 am

It's quite common for me to start my day off with a few eggs. Last night we were watching Masterchef and G' Ramsey gave a challenge to the chefs to replicate his scrambled eggs.
Find the video recipe here:
https://youtu.be/PUP7U5vTMM0

It's different. I don't normally care much for a moist egg, but these were different in a good way. I left off the tomatoes and mushrooms and all I had was seeded rye bread for the toast.

BTW, if anyone watched that Masterchef show I have no idea how some of the chefs got it so wrong. It's super easy to do. One negative, it sticks to the bottom of the pot (SS), or it did for me. BTW, notice the pan he's using for the mushroom and tomatoes... carbon steel.
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Re: Breakfast

Postby Rufus » Thu Jul 06, 2017 8:19 am

Amazingly simple. I think I'll give it a try this weekend, including tomatoes and mushrooms.
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Re: Breakfast

Postby ShadowsDad » Thu Jul 06, 2017 2:00 pm

I would have liked to do the sides too, but I didn't have them. Smoked salmon could also be added. Probably could top the eggs with a bit of caviar too.

He added creme fraiche (sp?); since I can't buy it and have to make it I used some sour cream that I did have. It worked.

Rufus I used a timer for the 30 seconds on the heat each time. You might think it won't work, but it does. 30 seconds is an amazingly short time when one is moving the eggs around.

After you make them and see how easy it is to replicate check out the show. http://www.fox.com/watch/972223043705/7684704768#

skip to after the second advertisement break in the blue progress bar. Even after not getting it right the first time many couldn't do much better the 2nd time. Yes, they were given an opportunity for redemption. If you have ad blocking enabled you'll need to sit through an amount of message telling you that you should allow ads. Just wait and the show will return in 30 seconds.
Brian

Maker of Kramperts Finest Bay Rum and Frostbite http://www.krampertsfinest.com/
Or find it here: Italian Barber, West Coast Shaving, Barclay Crocker, The Old Town Shaving Company at Stats, Maggard Razors; Leavitt & Peirce, Harvard Square
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Re: Breakfast

Postby EL Alamein » Thu Jul 06, 2017 7:11 pm

Well, I've watched that video a few times in the past and I've made scrambled eggs that way. I don't prefer them that way though.

One point of contention that I have with Gordon is seasoning the eggs prior to scrambling them. In my humble experience it makes no difference and his claim that seasoning them before scrambling them makes a watery concoction is nonsense. Julia Child and Jacques Pepin, in their recipes, both season their scrambled eggs prior to cooking them. This goes way back to the "Mastering the Art of French Cooking". I made them that way for years and our growing family loved them.

When I first tried it his way I detected no difference. At one time I did some research and there are a lot of youtube videos that back this up. They test the eggs at each point and conclude that there are no difference to seasoning before and after cooking. This agrees with what I've experienced.

I've made those eggs many times both ways and they've always turned out excellent.

Personally I like my scrambled eggs firmer and have returned to my prior way of cooking them until almost at that point (they'll keep cooking until plated) so that when plated their perfect. It's a matter of taste one could say. I know that he's making a custard and that's great, if you prefer them that way. If that's the case then they'll turn out perfect whether seasoning ahead of time or after cooking them.

Enjoy them as you like.

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Re: Breakfast

Postby fallingwickets » Fri Jul 07, 2017 4:55 am

Im a masterchef fan too and after watching the episode, my partner and I were all lustful for gordons scrambled eggs. We thought they were tasty. Maybe the heat(?) but my version took a long time to get firm, or a lot longer than the 7'ish minutes mentioned on the show and the ten minute youtube video. I think the pot was on/off the stove for about 17-18 minutes. Is it possible that stirring non-stop adds to the time?

It was fun to make and definitely an experience, but wayyyyyyyyy to much work for me to do again any time soon. I will be using the creme fraiche addition again ( i have to: I have a whole bucket leftover HAHA)

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Re: Breakfast

Postby ShadowsDad » Fri Jul 07, 2017 5:54 am

Clive, how high is your heat turned up to? I have gas, and the med' size burner is turned up to med' high. I had 6 eggs in the pot and they were cooked custard like in 4-5 minutes. An electric range, if that's what you're using, might be different.

BTW, Gordon didn't state the heat, but I got the heat level from checking out the flame on his burner.

Chris, sometimes cooks get something in their heads and it can't be driven out. Like using a microplane for zesting citrus (lemon or lime specifically). I wish I had a dollar for each time i've heard someone say to stop before getting to the pith. Just try to microplane pith. It can't happen. The microplane won't go into the pith. I specifically tried to zest pith with one and despite the pressure applied and time I did it for it just wouldn't do it. Maybe my microplane is a special "fine" model, but I don't think so.

Or browning garlic makes it bitter. Well, maybe, except for when the recipe calls for browned garlic, then magically the garlic isn't bitter so it seems.

In a different direction, one of my pet peeves is a chef who uses a separate spoon to taste a dish, then puts the used spoon on the cutting board. That drives me absolutely wild. Somehow they got the idea that would somehow be OK to do. It's not. It's filthy. I love J. Pepins cooking shows, but he's one of the biggest violators of that. Or the chef that puts a finger in the mouth then grabs an ingredient with that hand and pointer finger and starts chopping (another Pepin move). Another chef takes a spoon out of his apron, uses it and puts it back in the apron for the next dish. Maybe he has an autoclave built into the apron pocket, or just a double sink in it that washes and rinses the spoon before each tasting.

My point is that chefs get ideas in their minds and they might not be the smartest people, but they are good at cooking food.

But yes, I caught that about the salt after cooking and it grabbed my attention as being BS also. Maybe he was trying to make the technique proof for fools by putting all of the seasoning in at the end* and didn't want to outright insult people. In the case of the Masterchef show results I can see that happening. It's easy to replicate the technique, yet if I remember correctly 6 of them failed at it.
*Putting black pepper in too early did result in greyish eggs that could be seen as greyish when put next to eggs where the pepper had been added just before taking out pf the pot.
Last edited by ShadowsDad on Fri Jul 07, 2017 6:23 am, edited 1 time in total.
Brian

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Or find it here: Italian Barber, West Coast Shaving, Barclay Crocker, The Old Town Shaving Company at Stats, Maggard Razors; Leavitt & Peirce, Harvard Square
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Re: Breakfast

Postby fallingwickets » Fri Jul 07, 2017 6:21 am

I had the heat on the lowest it would go because for some reason ( real or imagined) I heard gordon say "low heat"

On the subject of stoves, I went the gas route and regret it every single day. I think electric gives you a lot more control over the heat. I am a very bad cook to begin with; heat is the least of my problems :D :D :D but i like to think it plays a part!

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Re: Breakfast

Postby ShadowsDad » Fri Jul 07, 2017 6:33 am

I had exactly the opposite experience with gas vs electric. I learned on gas and loved it because I could "see" the heat. I later had electric and cursed it every time I went to use it. We recently spent a few $k in converting the kitchen over to gas. I have never regretted spending the $.

One huge advantage to gas... With electric, unless the heating elements are perfectly flat, it give hot spots. To combat that I cut some 1/4" sheet steel. When cooking something that couldn't tolerate hot spots I would put the pan on the burner with the steel between. No need to do that with gas. Too, the IR broiler in the oven is hugely more powerful than the electric broiler ever thought of being. I have actually successfully used it to brown meat after sous videing it, instead of using direct flame from a butane torch. Yeah, its that powerful. Open the door when the broiler is on and the IR radiation can be felt 10 feet away on the feet if wearing sandals.

I never cooked on induction. I might like that.
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Maker of Kramperts Finest Bay Rum and Frostbite http://www.krampertsfinest.com/
Or find it here: Italian Barber, West Coast Shaving, Barclay Crocker, The Old Town Shaving Company at Stats, Maggard Razors; Leavitt & Peirce, Harvard Square
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Re: Breakfast

Postby EL Alamein » Fri Jul 07, 2017 6:07 pm

Brian, you hit many of my pet peeves about Chef's habits. I especially hate the spoon thing for tasting, I use a fresh spoon every time while the old one goes in the sink. And I agree about chef's getting something into their head and not being able to shake it.

And yeah on the microplaning citrus zest. I don't even bother with a microplane anymore to do so. I just use a plain grater and keep the rind moving.

And I too prefer gas but it's not available where I live, it's an all electric neighborhood by government decree so many decades ago. We're allowed to install propane and a few have done so but I won't, at least not now. I have five children, two of them boys and being a risk mitigator by profession I couldn't sleep at night with their habits of trying everything even when mommy and daddy say no. I would have nightmares of the boys pounding on the tanks outside with rocks or turning on the flame inside. They're young yet (4 and 2) so when they get more mature things may change. I've adjusted to electric for now and I'm happy.

All that said I really like watching Gordon's videos. I may not agree with everything he does but he definitely does have some tasty recipes. I looking forward to making his Christmas Beef Wellington at some point.

I've made his strawberry sauce for crumpets and it is fantastic. It gets gobbled every time I make it.

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Re: Breakfast

Postby Rufus » Fri Jul 07, 2017 8:36 pm

I much prefer gas over electric fir a cooktop. We'll soon be re-doing our kitchen and we've been looking at replacing the gas cooktop with an induction cooktop. But, back to GR's scrambled eggs, I'm glad that you, Brian, mentioned to cook on medium-high heat; I hadn't pick up on this watching the video. As for creme fraiche, I can't find it here, but I'm told that 10% MF Greek Yogurt or full fat sour cream cut with a little heavy cream make good substitutes.
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Re: Breakfast

Postby ShadowsDad » Sat Jul 08, 2017 6:33 am

Strawberry sauce, I need to try that!

Rufus, it's easy to make creme fraiche. It just takes time so you make it a day ahead. It's a pint of heavy cream and 2 TBLs of live culture yogurt or buttermilk. Mix and let sit out at room temp'. It should be very visibly thickened and that takes a day or longer. But go by the resulting thickening and not by time. Sour cream can be used as an instant substitute, but it's not really the same.
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Or find it here: Italian Barber, West Coast Shaving, Barclay Crocker, The Old Town Shaving Company at Stats, Maggard Razors; Leavitt & Peirce, Harvard Square
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Re: Breakfast

Postby Barry » Sat Jul 08, 2017 3:45 pm

Speaking of eggs I was just watching a YouTube video of Jacques Pepin preparing a traditional French omelette.

I’ll give it a go again.... maybe several knowing my luck.
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Re: Breakfast

Postby EL Alamein » Sat Jul 08, 2017 5:36 pm

ShadowsDad wrote:Strawberry sauce, I need to try that!

Rufus, it's easy to make creme fraiche. It just takes time so you make it a day ahead. It's a pint of heavy cream and 2 TBLs of live culture yogurt or buttermilk. Mix and let sit out at room temp'. It should be very visibly thickened and that takes a day or longer. But go by the resulting thickening and not by time. Sour cream can be used as an instant substitute, but it's not really the same.


Brian, strawberry sauce is a great way to use up strawberrys not eaten. This frequently happens with us due to five kids and varying fancies. Same scenario with bananas they get made into a pudding for dessert if not eaten. The same could work for anyone that didn't eat up any loose fruit.

Also, make crumpets home made if you fancy them, they're excellent. Cross between a pancake and an English muffin.

Rufus, I completely agree with Brian, make the creme fraiche at home. You can also make buttermilk homemade and tailor the quantity for whatever recipe you're making. I frequently do so when making pancakes for the family. I never buy either anymore.

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Re: Breakfast

Postby brothers » Tue Jul 11, 2017 3:41 pm

I enjoy watching them cook when I get a chance. I also like to read the comments you gents have contributed above and elsewhere. Years of making breakfast have put me into a stubborn frame of mind about what we like and how we like it cooked. Generally speaking I've got my scrambled egg habit that in some ways is slightly similar to Gordon's. Mainly the on/off heat process. Some things like that seem to be a product of using common sense as opposed to blindly following someone else's methods. Love to eat and love to cook when I can.
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Re: Breakfast

Postby fallingwickets » Wed Jul 12, 2017 4:36 am

We're allowed to install propane and a few have done so but I won't,


Two years ago I went through a major remodel; next time around I want an all electric house! Anyway, I quoted the propane part only to say, and this from the very depths of my heart and soul.....NEVER, EVER get propane unless thats all there is. Propane dealers are worse than their oil brethren....everything is top secret, there is zero price transparency, zero regulation and like the airlines, a seemingly unlimited fee tack-on protocol. All this to say: AVOID AT ALL COST

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Re: Breakfast

Postby ShadowsDad » Wed Jul 12, 2017 6:32 am

From eggs to the propane industry.

That's true to a certain extent Clive, even in Maine, and I hated it possibly even more than you did. Maybe Maine is unique, I don't know. We own our own tanks and that means we can shop around. Just like owning your own automobile gas tank allows you to shop around for benzine. We have never paid the going, and frankly exorbitant, rate for propane. Now we're a member of a group of tank owners who have banded together to negotiate even better prices for ourselves. Last time we filled up we paid just over $1/gallon.

FWIW, when we were pricing it on our own I would call around and when we were paying (made up numbers since it was years ago) $2/gal other suppliers wanted close to $5/gal. While the numbers are actual they are close. I remember asking one gouger if it was delivered in a truck made of gold after he wouldn't give a realistic price.

There's one local outfit that in order to get their quite good price demands that they come into the home to see what we have that burns their gas (an "inspection"). They can keep their propane. Many people knuckle under to that to get the good price they have, but I never did and I always did almost as good as their price. Now I do much better and I don't need to call around for pricing.

So it is possible to not take part in what you and I dislike about the gas industry. But I disliked electric even more. For us it was a very expensive option. We are paying not just a little less for energy now but hugely less. Most of that savings came from our hot water. It costs us approx' $80/year for our hot water, and cooking. If I remember correctly our electric hot water tank was costing us $50/month.

I think if more people took the bull by the horns and bought their own tanks much of what you don't like about the industry would be a thing of the past. Too many folks just go to a gas supplier and rent their tanks (that's what it amounts to) and from then on are tied to whatever abuse the supplier wants to deliver to the customer.
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Or find it here: Italian Barber, West Coast Shaving, Barclay Crocker, The Old Town Shaving Company at Stats, Maggard Razors; Leavitt & Peirce, Harvard Square
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Re: Breakfast

Postby fallingwickets » Thu Jul 13, 2017 6:01 am

I bought my tank outright...500 gallons. Gouging etc in NJ is same as Maine...ridiculous. The issue here, (especially in this part of NJ) maybe unlike Maine is that nearly everyone is on natural gas and so there is a very limited (3) amount of companies to call for service. Ive actally given serious thought to buying my own truck and getting it filled 'wholesale' and setting up a co-op. The problem is that there are so few houses left that use propane. The whole reason for switching from electric / oil was to set the house up in the event that natural gas was brought to our street. When I called the gas co. about extending a line from a nearby development going up, they said sure:$247,000 :shock: :shock: It wouldnt be bad split amongst the neighbours, however most are too old to care, and one is a local oil dealer LOL.

Anyway, for all these reasons and others I hope the propane industry implodes :D


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Re: Breakfast

Postby ShadowsDad » Thu Jul 13, 2017 1:37 pm

You must not live in a rural area. Propane shines there.

Yeah, it sounds as though you have no leverage. That puts you at their mercy and that's never good. If I had to pay here what some dealers want for the gas there would be no advantage to propane for me either. I'd hate to go back to electric for cooking and hot water but we'd get by. $1/4 million to run a line!!? It's less expensive to move the house to a line or just move period!

If it helps you feel better I'll hope along with you that the propane industry in NJ implodes, but I wish it good health up here in Maine. Maine is largely rural and we need it. We get lots of power outages due to the heavily forested nature of Maine and gas works fine without drawing huge power from my PV system. I don't miss running the generator to finish a dish but I've done that in the past.
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Or find it here: Italian Barber, West Coast Shaving, Barclay Crocker, The Old Town Shaving Company at Stats, Maggard Razors; Leavitt & Peirce, Harvard Square
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Re: Breakfast

Postby brothers » Sat Jul 15, 2017 8:22 pm

I didn't have any idea about these situations in your part of the continent. We take it for granted that both electricity and natural gas are readily available in virtually all homes. Back in the '60s there were total electric homes and apartments, touted to be convenient but only because the electric company wanted to sell more electricity. Briefly, in the early '70s we lived in a total electric apartment and the electric bill (paid by the tenants, of course) was astronomical every month, and to make it even worse, the perimeter electric "heaters" simply did not provide enough heat! It was cold inside and the electric meter was spinning wildly. We got out of there as soon as the first lease expired. Never again. [-X Of course, folks living in rural areas still use propane.
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Re: Breakfast

Postby fallingwickets » Mon Jul 17, 2017 3:05 am

I think electricity gets a bad name from the 20th century! But whatever the case actually is, my biggest issue with other energy sources is that they aren't readily available. The chance of me digging a hole in the backyard and finding either a gas source or a gusher of oil is basically nil, however, I have geothermal, wind and solar options right at my fingertips ( well maybe not wind yet, but i imagine in the near future windmills of miniature size). Battery tech to store unused solar and wind power is exploding everywhere. My heart is in electricity and I wouldnt be surprised at all to see a revision back to gary's 1970's type electrical served apartments, houses etc before the end of the 2020's

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