Drop Scones

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drmoss_ca
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Drop Scones

Post by drmoss_ca » Sat Feb 24, 2018 1:22 pm

These small, thick, miniature pancakes were known as 'girdle scones' in my family. It's typical in north east England to call a griddle a girdle. The 'scone' part is debatable - for many people a girdle scone (or griddle scone) is a bready, crumbly affair, a pan-fried equivalent of an oven-baked scone, which is itself a close relative of the north American 'biscuit', which is differentiated as being a whole lot less crumbly than a real British scone. Somewhere amongst all this is the realisation that batter and dough are two ends of a spectrum, and the difference lies in the fluid content.
Never mind. For my purposes, let's call a small thick pancake made from batter rather than dough a 'drop scone'. The pan-fried bread-like scones I know of as 'Geordie Hinnies' or Welsh Cakes, and I'll not deal with them today. Let's talk about drop scones. They came to mind in part because of the thread about Marmite. There was another substance available in a traditional English kitchen that I remembered: Tate & Lyle Golden Syrup. A splendid old-fashioned tin, with a dead lion (!) surrounded by bees and the motto "Out of the strong came forth sweetness"
Lyle'sGoldenSyrup.jpg
Lyle'sGoldenSyrup.jpg (133.09 KiB) Viewed 1164 times
All dreadfully Old Testament. However, just as a batter made Yorkshire pudding to fill up the family so they might eat less meat, drop scones made a cheap meal for miners' families in the Durham coalfields, and with some Golden Syrup on top they still make a lovely treat. What you need will be:

6oz all-purpose flour
1/8 tsp salt
1½oz sugar
1 tsp baking soda
2 tsp cream of tartar
2 eggs
1 gill/120ml//¼ US pint of milk (I enjoyed that bit!)

Mix the dry ingredients, add the eggs and milk and whisk into a thick batter. I don't measure the milk - I add it until the batter is a bit thicker and gooier than I would want for pancakes, but that measure seems about right. Heat a non-stick flat-bottomed pan and wipe it with an oil-soaked bundle of kitchen paper (which you will keep to refresh the surface as you go along). Take a one tablespoon measure of the batter and pour it onto the hot pan, repeating three times so there is a 2-3" pancake at each cardinal point. If your pan is big enough, you might fit a fifth in the middle. Let them cook until the top loses its lustre and appears slightly dull - at this point the top will be full of craters from burst bubbles, and this will take just 1-2 minutes. Flip each over and cook the other side for a further minute. Place onto a warmed plate and continue until the batter is all gone and the plate has a stack of drop scones crying out to be eaten.
Serve with Golden Syrup. I think a bottle or tin of syrup and a teaspoon is the way to go, and let people apply it themselves. They don't keep well, so eat them all!

Image

Chris
PS If you try very hard you might find a tin like the one above that is red rather than green. This is Tate & Lyle Black Treacle, which is about a hundred-fold more concentrated than north American molasses. Use, and enjoy, carefully. It is very addictive.
"Je n'ai pas besoin de cette hypothèse."
Pierre-Simon de Laplace

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ShadowsDad
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Re: Drop Scones

Post by ShadowsDad » Sat Feb 24, 2018 3:11 pm

Would the red can be more like our Blackstrap Molasses?

BTW, BM makes decent drink; well, I liked it as a child. A tablespoon or 2 in a glass of milk. It really jacks up the iron in ones blood over time. Makes the lips look as though one is almost wearing lipstick.
Brian

Maker of Kramperts Finest Bay Rum and Frostbite http://www.krampertsfinest.com/
Or find it here: Italian Barber, West Coast Shaving, Barclay Crocker, The Old Town Shaving Company at Stats, Maggard Razors; Leavitt & Peirce, Harvard Square

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drmoss_ca
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Re: Drop Scones

Post by drmoss_ca » Sat Feb 24, 2018 3:43 pm

I think it's a lot thicker and more concentrated, by which I mean not sweeter, but more tarry, rather as if scraped off the very bottom of the vessel in which the syrup was boiled. I suppose, thinking wildly here, it might be different as it might be made from sugar beets rather than sugar cane. Here is the tin with a known brush for scale:
IMG_0268.jpg
IMG_0268.jpg (132.35 KiB) Viewed 1154 times
Anyway, nothing to do with drop scones. But we could get into treacle toffee or the traditional Guy Fawkes Night toffee known up north as Tom Trot.

C.
"Je n'ai pas besoin de cette hypothèse."
Pierre-Simon de Laplace

EL Alamein
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Re: Drop Scones

Post by EL Alamein » Mon Feb 26, 2018 7:20 pm

That syrup is available at the local supermarket (Wegman's) which we frequent weekly. And the recipe is right there and now the wife wants some.

I'll never loose the extra pounds from the Christmas Holidays, I'm doomed.

Chris

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ShadowsDad
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Re: Drop Scones

Post by ShadowsDad » Mon Feb 26, 2018 11:36 pm

I've been researching the blackstrap vs Lyles black treacle issue. Heck, there is no magic in converting sugar cane juice into sugar. Everyone uses a similar process.

The short story... If your local blackstrap is thin and runny, it isn't the same as Lyles. If it is thick, has an almost burnt taste and doesn't like to pour then it's a good sub' for the Lyles Black Treacle (yeah I have some of that!). At least that's my take on the issue. You have no idea how difficult it is to get folks to even use the same words/definitions on the 'net regarding this. They're using English words but local meanings for those words near as I could figure. Anyway, that's the best I could come up with.

Yeah, it's what I use in my "world famous" :) baked beans! Yeah, that was a joke. I find humor in manufacturers claiming things such as that.
Brian

Maker of Kramperts Finest Bay Rum and Frostbite http://www.krampertsfinest.com/
Or find it here: Italian Barber, West Coast Shaving, Barclay Crocker, The Old Town Shaving Company at Stats, Maggard Razors; Leavitt & Peirce, Harvard Square

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