Ribs in the oven, I kniow, heresy

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Sam
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Ribs in the oven, I kniow, heresy

Post by Sam » Thu Mar 01, 2018 6:39 pm

I have learned that some bbq competition-level cooks will, at times, do some of their ribs when they cook at home in the oven, either after an hour of smoke or the whole way. I have a friend who gave me some rub and told me to baste the ribs with dijon mustard and sprinkle the rub really well over both sides of the ribs. Wrap in foil and refrigerate at least two hours. Heat oven to 250 degrees and put the ribs in the foil, upside down, on a baking sheet. Cook two hours. Open up the ribs, leaving foil peeled back. Ribs now face up. Raise the heat to 300. You can redo the rub and heat for 30 minutes or you can slather bbq sauce liberally over them and heat 30 minutes. Then it is 350 for 30 minutes. You can reapply sauce for this last 30 minutes or more rub, and then if you go rub, someone said a light schmear of honey over the ribs the last 10 minutes.

No one has complained about them, and they taste better than the Chilis or TGI Fridays version, though those places, having wood stoves, can get a nice little char on them.

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Re: Ribs in the oven, I kniow, heresy

Post by EL Alamein » Thu Mar 01, 2018 7:56 pm

Sam, we do our ribs in the oven but nothing that fancy but now that you've posted I'm going to try them that way.

I just cook them all day at 225 basting them in their natural juices every hour or so. Then in the last hour in BBQ sauce. I do salt and pepper them before beginning all that. They do turn out great.

Chris

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Re: Ribs in the oven, I kniow, heresy

Post by fallingwickets » Fri Mar 02, 2018 8:29 am

225 all day? Ive done 300 for a couple of hours and then drowned them in a store bought bbq sauce. Im still here to tell you the story!! :D I am obviously am clueless about bbq and have no idea whats good or bad....i just love it all!! I'm reminded of a sign i once saw in a pizza shop that i'll substitute bbq for:

bbq is like sex. when its good, its really good and when its bad its still pretty good!

clive
de gustibus non est disputandum

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Re: Ribs in the oven, I kniow, heresy

Post by brothers » Fri Mar 02, 2018 9:18 pm

In this region of the country, we have some barbeque. A few years back we had the pleasure of visiting Virginia on vacation. In one of the cities, there was a BBQ place out on the highway that advertised the best BBQ in the world. Pretty confident, I'd say. We made a point to visit on the appointed day, and we did not agree with the sign. Nevertheless, the little place was absolutely packed with folks who were ecstatic with their all-you-can eat rib dinners. These ribs were oven-cooked. It's obviously a regional taste differential.
Gary

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Re: Ribs in the oven, I kniow, heresy

Post by EL Alamein » Sat Mar 03, 2018 7:26 pm

Clive, beyond what I do for ribs I'm pretty clueless too. I also use store bought barbecue sauce (whatever the wife buys on sale).

I should probably clarify about "all day". I really mean I put them in about noon and we each diner around 7 PM nightly. I'm pretty diligent about basting them and they do tend to turn out pretty tender. They are kinda like the "table wine" of ribs - good enough for every day.

Gary, I know what you mean. My step mother is from North Carolina. About twenty years ago she took me to Bob Jones BBQ in North Carolina. It's a pretty famous place locally, supposedly. At the time they didn't have a cash register - the money was sprawled on the counter and they did the math in their head for what you owed and change. What I remember that we got was a vinegar based barbecue pork in a cardboard rectangular bowl with a large slice of cornbread and a soda pop in the glass bottle, mind you.

It was fantastic to me BUT very different from any barbecue I'd ever had in my life up until then or since. I believe the barbecue sauce was vinegar based instead of tomato sauce based like so much of what is available in supermarkets here. I love the taste of vinegar personally so it may explain my enjoyment of it (vinegar is used in a lot of French cooking). A lot of people dislike vinegar from what I have heard. Maybe that was the difference? Who knows as there is a plethora of things that go into proprietary barbecue sauce.

Chris

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Re: Ribs in the oven, I kniow, heresy

Post by ShadowsDad » Sun Mar 04, 2018 12:27 am

BBQ sauce, especially down south, is traditionally made from what they had readily on hand after the Civil War. It varies greatly from place to place due to that.

I make some pretty tasty ribs when I rarely make them, but my homemade sauce is like nothing that anyone down south has ever tasted. When I developed it I had no preconceived notions and just wanted it to be packed with flavor and I wanted the entire tongue involved (there I go salivating). I find most factory BBQ sauces to be far to sweet. I wanted mine sweet , but also tart, and slightly hot and it should be thick but without using thickeners. In short I wanted a huge depth of flavor. I won't give my recipe, but I have another recipe that I make that works pretty good. If anyone wants it just let me know. It called Beals Wild Boar Soul BBQ sauce if I remember the name correctly. It's from the Pacific NW. It's not mine, but it's pretty good and I make it and mine exclusively so how bad can it be?

Locally we had a Beale Street BBQ joint and a few friends and I went there to try it. It was the best 'Q I'd had that day, but privately I gauged it against my own, and while I was full and content, mine was better.

Faux BBQ is better than no BBQ if that's what one has available. I think everyone has been there at one time or another. It's not really heresy if you call it what it is; faux BBQ. It can be pretty tasty and tender and I have yet to turn my nose up at it.

I've even been known to (salivating again) braise chicken in a bath of my sauce until it thickens and sticks to the skinless chicken parts. Faux BBQ, but still tasty and back then it could be done after getting home from work. Geez! I haven't done that in over a decade! But it's finger lickin' good!
Brian

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Or find it here: Italian Barber, West Coast Shaving, Barclay Crocker, The Old Town Shaving Company at Stats, Maggard Razors; Leavitt & Peirce, Harvard Square

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Re: Ribs in the oven, I kniow, heresy

Post by fallingwickets » Sun Mar 04, 2018 10:29 am

Brian....give up the recipe!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

:D :D :D

:roll:

:D :D

I was in myrtle beach this past week and went to try 'real southern' bbq. a place http://www.simplysouthernsmokehouse.com/ with high goog reviews was chosen and off we went. I didnt realize it was buffet style which was a pleasant surprise, only because im a piglet that loves to eat. I went to a bbq shop when i visited charleston and everything was priced per pound...didnt take long for dinner to become uber costly! Anyway, the food at simply southern was ok, but the reason Im writing about it is because I had a mustard based bbq sauce for the very first time which i really liked and a vinegar bbq sauce, also for the very first time, but I did not like the vinegar bbq at all which is a bit odd as Im a pickle addict and a big fan of vinegar in general

clive

p.s Brian....give up the recipe!!! :lol:
de gustibus non est disputandum

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Re: Ribs in the oven, I kniow, heresy

Post by ShadowsDad » Sun Mar 04, 2018 10:59 am

I wasn't holding out, I just didn't want to go through the hassle if no one wanted it. My notes to myself are indicated, the rest is as I copied it.

Mr. Beal's 'J.K's Wild Boar Soul BBQ' Sauce
mike.flaherty

Yes, we have (all sorts of) real BBQ in Seattle. An eclectic mix of folks from lots of different places. In the 80's there was a tiny place up on Cherry St, called J.K's Wild Boar Soul BBQ. You had to watch out for the needles on the sidewalk, dark little room with years of smoke on it, you'd order a pile of meat, and get a side of incredible beans, and 2 slices of white bread wrapped in foil. And change for the pop machine if you needed it. The proprietors name was Beal, I believe. As I recall, a retired navy cook and utter BBQ maestro. His sauce was spectacular, and he's also use that sauce as a base for his beans.
When Beal quit in the mid 80's, I thought my life was over. There was no other BBQ that even came close here. And it was the sauce that shone.
So the other night, I'm at a guy's house, downing margaritas and sampling various hot sauces, and he says "Try this!" I immediately knew what it was..... Beals sauce! Amazing. This guy had eaten at the wild boar every week for years. He and his wife would bring in their attempts to duplicate the sauce, and after months of trying, Mr. Beal took pity on them and finally gave them his recipe. This is a "½" recipe, and makes 2 quarts.

Ingredients:
1/6 cup salt
2 cups sugar
1/2 cup heaping packed brown sugar
2 cups (16oz) tomato paste (**Brian s Note**Sub 1 cup Tomato Powder)
1 cup Worcestershire
1/2 cup white vinegar
1 cup yellow mustard
1 cup beef bouillon strong
6 cups water (**Brians Note**Next time reduce this to 4 cups for less reduction time)
1/2 cup Wrights liquid smoke. Yes, that's not a typo.
Kitchen Bouquet to darken (Optional, don't worry if you don't have this)
Chili Powder (the real thing), cayenne, Daves, whatever to add heat. Hatch ground chile is my favorite. I might try adding baby schezuan peppers or chili pequins next time. I also like to make a not too hot sauce, and serve with lots of sliced fresh jalapeno.

**Brians Note** 1st batch I added 1/4 cup Sriracha and 1/4 cup Hot Hung Paprika.

Directions:
Mix in a big pot salt, sugar, brown sugar, beef bouillon and water.
When sugar dissolves, add yellow mustard, white vinegar, liquid smoke,
Worcestershire, tomato paste, kitchen bouquet and chili powder.
Simmer bubbling slowly for 2 hours.... will reduce by 1/3 and darken.

Q&A's:
How Much Chile Powder To Add?
It's impossible to tell- some chile powder is as hot as hell, some's not, and some folks like
really HOT sauce, some can't handle it. But I think you can find out quickly..... if it's HOT, just add so much (1/4 cup?) at a time, and then taste. That's about the only way I know of not to get into trouble with Scoville!
Personally. I like stuff pretty dang HOT. But since not many of my friends do (weenies!), I make it pretty "weak", and then add the hot either by spice or by fresh chopped japalano or serrano, to my own servings. I've been using this stuff called Chipotle Morita lately (Kinda like rough chopped chipotle peppers). Or (my soapbox) seek out HATCH chile powder from HATCH N.M. Delicious deep red rich stuff.
OR...since it makes so much, I split it up and leave some of it "MILD" and make some of it "ROCKIN'".

How Much Kitchen Bouquet To Add?
Well, I haven't the vaguest, but the recipe says "Add to darken" so a few small pourings (3 TBS) seems to darken the sauce somewhat, so there I go!

How Long To Cook?
I watched a friend make this one weekend, and he got confused. He didn't cook it enough. You need to simmer, so it's bubbling at, gosh how shall I say it... a low to medium rate, for 2 hours. Stove set at 2/3 the distance between low and medium. It will lose about 1/3 of its volume, and get darker and thicker. When it's done, it's not thin like it started out, and it's not paste. Stir occasionally, but I've never had it stick. If it's getting sauce on your stove as it cooks, you
probably have it on too high!
Vaya Con BBQ!

*****************************

Here's another one that I think is exceptional on short ribs. It works best in a cooker that has a large amount of air passing through so as to dry it out and develop a sticky coating on the meat. Don't forget to add smoking wood for added flavor.

Black BBQ Sauce

1 cup soy sauce
1 cup catsup
1 TBLS dry mustard
½ cup white wine
½ cup honey
2 pieces candied Ginger (I use ginger extract that I make and I don't need to boil it)

Mix all ingredients and allow to simmer, covered for a few minutes.

Be advised: This sauce burns easily over direct heat.
Brian

Maker of Kramperts Finest Bay Rum and Frostbite http://www.krampertsfinest.com/
Or find it here: Italian Barber, West Coast Shaving, Barclay Crocker, The Old Town Shaving Company at Stats, Maggard Razors; Leavitt & Peirce, Harvard Square

EL Alamein
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Re: Ribs in the oven, I kniow, heresy

Post by EL Alamein » Sun Mar 04, 2018 8:31 pm

Brian, these are going directly into my recipe book and will be used on the next batch of ribs I make (one batch at a time, mind you). I am salivating just reading this.

Thank you so much!!

Chris

P.S. Clive, thank you for asking!

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Re: Ribs in the oven, I kniow, heresy

Post by CMur12 » Sun Mar 04, 2018 10:00 pm

I might point out that in Washington State we would use ketchup. 8)

- Murray
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Re: Ribs in the oven, I kniow, heresy

Post by ShadowsDad » Sun Mar 04, 2018 11:03 pm

LOL Murray!

Chris, I'm currently working on dipping sauces for chicken fingers. I made one today that shows great promise if it isn't reduced to thicken it for BBQ. Its tart (and as hot as one wants it to be) and I like acidic sauces. After making it and tasting on a spoon I thought it would work even for BBQ which is what it's designed for. It doesn't have the depth of flavor that mine has, but frankly no BBQ sauce that I've tasted does. But it's much quicker to make.

Please let me know how you like the sauces even if you hate them.

I need to find a way to use the black sauce in my ceramic cooker. It has so little draft that I've been concerned that it would never reduce while on the short ribs and develop the sticky coating. I haven't made it in decades for that reason. But it has been right up front in my mind for quite some time now. I need to find a way.
Brian

Maker of Kramperts Finest Bay Rum and Frostbite http://www.krampertsfinest.com/
Or find it here: Italian Barber, West Coast Shaving, Barclay Crocker, The Old Town Shaving Company at Stats, Maggard Razors; Leavitt & Peirce, Harvard Square

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Re: Ribs in the oven, I kniow, heresy

Post by ShadowsDad » Sat Mar 10, 2018 3:27 pm

Here is that sauce I mentioned above as I copied it years ago. I use it as a dipping sauce for chicken fingers, unthickened. It's very tart, which I like, balance the recipe against what your taste buds like. The text says to use it warmed and that's exactly how I've been using it. (I'm salivating right now because that's exactly what I have for supper tonight along with pickled veggies... cauliflower, and okra (and I'm about to eat).

Of course it can be used as a BBQ sauce at the BBQ or at the table.

***************
An Authentic, Old-School Mississippi Barbecue Sauce


Before it became the world wide phenomenon it is today, barbecue was uniquely American and this cuisine is what we are celebrating here along with our Nation's birthday. Because of this, It is appropriate I post this recipe here. I hope you enjoy it.

An Authentic, Old-School Mississippi Barbecue Sauce

This recipe is from "The Food's of a Younger Land": A portrait of American food - before the national highway system, before chain restaurants, and before frozen food, when the nation's food was seasonal, regional, and traditional - from the lost WPA files.

Amazon's book description nails it
"In the throes of the Great Depression, a make-work initiative for authors-called "America Eats"-was created by the WPA to chronicle the eating habits, traditions, and struggles of local Americans. Mark Kurlansky, author of Salt and Cod, unearths this forgotten literary treasure, chronicling a bygone era when Americans had never heard of fast food or grocery superstores. Kurlansky brings together the WPA contributions-featuring New York automats and Georgia Coca-Cola parties, Maine lobsters and Montana beaver tails-and brilliantly showcases them with authentic recipes, anecdotes, and photographs."

The following description is posted here with permission from the author of the original thread.

One of the many talented writers employed by the project was Eudora Welty, who went on to become quite well-known. As a member of the project in about 1939, she recorded the recipe used by James Acker at his home, The Magnolias, which is located in Aberdeen, Mississippi.

The Magnolias was famous for the barbecue parties held there, and this "house recipe" for their barbecue sauce really drew me in.

Normally, I am not much of a sauce person when it comes to barbecue; I prefer to utilise a progressive layering of flavours, beginning with a mustard or some other slather, followed by a dry rub, then by mopping or basting during cooking, and finishing with a thin glaze that dries to a crackling shine.

Be that as it may, I was intrigued by this sauce, not only because of its ingredients, but also because this was a direct link to genuine, Old-South barbecue history, and I knew I had to try it. I used it on a chicken that i was cooking on my rotisserie, and the results were incredible. The flavours using these simple ingredients were quintessentially barbecue, but were also at the same time something unique that was entirely new to me. savory, tangy, well-balanced and delicious - I encourage anyone, skeptic or not, to give it a try; you will not be disappointed.

The recipe, as transcribed by Welty, consists of heating together:

½ cup or 4 ounces vinegar (I used apple cider vinegar)
1 3/4 cup or 14 ounces catsup
1/3 cup or 3 ounces Worcestershire sauce (Lea & Perrins, of course!)
1/8 cup or 2 TBL or The juice of 1 lemon
2 tablespoons salt
Red and black pepper to taste (in deference to the Mrs., who does not care for spicy, I simply used about a tablespoon of Hungarian paprika and a teaspoon of black pepper)
1 stick or 4 ounces butter

That's it. Don't mess with it, don't "improve" it, and don't vary from it.... Simply heat the ingredients together, and you will end up with a beautiful, brick-red sauce that will be on the thin side. Reduce it to a thicker table sauce if you want, or simply mop/baste the meat constantly while cooking, letting the thin layers build over time, and you will be one happy camper.

As I said, I used this on chicken, but I am going to go out on a limb and say that this will also indeed be outstanding for pork, beef, and probably for robust fish as well. The flavour combination is one of those magical things that is much more than the sum of its parts - all ingredients contribute to the whole in wonderful harmony, from the rich undertones provided by the butter to the refreshing accents coming from the lemon. Very good stuff.

Two things:

1. The sauce does seem to come up a bit on the thin side - it seems to me that it is almost a basting sauce that is meant to be put on in layers, but I could be wrong. It serves well as a dipping sauce too, if reduced down a bit. Cooking it down a little also gives it a bit of something extra - caramelization? Maillard reaction? Not sure - but it's good. It's good either way, but it does have a couple of facets to be discovered that might be useful.

2. When this sauce is cold, it tastes a little off - the acidity really does come way out. I still like it, but not as much, and I would definitely consider it a sauce to be served warm or hot - or brushed on during the latter stages of cooking.

I can almost bet that all of the ingredients for this truly Southern barbecue sauce are already in your kitchen or pantry; give this a try and see for yourself - chances are you will enjoy it as much as I did.
Brian

Maker of Kramperts Finest Bay Rum and Frostbite http://www.krampertsfinest.com/
Or find it here: Italian Barber, West Coast Shaving, Barclay Crocker, The Old Town Shaving Company at Stats, Maggard Razors; Leavitt & Peirce, Harvard Square

brothers
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Re: Ribs in the oven, I kniow, heresy

Post by brothers » Sat Mar 10, 2018 5:54 pm

You bet I'll use the recipe on some ribs in the very near future. Quite a find! Thank you.
Not in the oven of course, but out in the smoker.
Gary

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Re: Ribs in the oven, I kniow, heresy

Post by fallingwickets » Sun Mar 11, 2018 7:43 am

Not in the oven of course, but out in the smoker.
rib snob!!!!! :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D
de gustibus non est disputandum

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Re: Ribs in the oven, I kniow, heresy

Post by brothers » Sun Mar 11, 2018 1:35 pm

If the sauce works on the ribs I'm thinking it's been a long time since I smoked a pork shoulder.
Gary

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Re: Ribs in the oven, I kniow, heresy

Post by Sam » Sun Mar 11, 2018 3:08 pm

Ditto to what Gary said

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