A real ivory Kent brush.

What kind of shaving brush do you use? Tell us all about it!
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Fido
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A real ivory Kent brush.

Post by Fido » Wed Apr 04, 2012 12:12 am

Another interesting find.


Image


Image

Shown between a Kent BK 8 and Kent BK 4.
And with the other recent find, the Kent V16.

And some detail.

Image


I asked Kent Brushes if they had any information about these brushes. This was their reply:


“Thank you for your interesting e-mail.
As far as we can determine this was a style of brush made in 1919 which came
in 4 sizes, model 1, 2, 3, 4, the brush illustrated is No.2.  However this
brush has been refilled (possibly in the 70's) with pure silvertip badger and the KENT shield was added, which was not available in 1919.
We trust the above information is of some interest and help.
Kind regards,
Consumer Service
Kent Brushes”

2 April 2012

The brush came from the same source as my V16 - a former Kent Brushes employee, now deceased.

The brush has a 21mm knot with a loft of 52mm, very dense and unused. Handle height is 67mm and base diameter 37mm.

The handle shape of the real ivory isn’t to my taste - a bit too slim. But it’s certainly unusual.

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KAV
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Post by KAV » Wed Apr 04, 2012 1:09 am

It isn't politically correct to admire objects made from plants and animals now in danger of being lost. But the truth is they ARE beautifull and can be admired with the caveat of knowing the present precipice we all teeter on. I imagine someday people will look at old plastic stuff and wonder how we could so wastefull and tasteless.
Lovely brush!

Jonnieboy61
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Post by Jonnieboy61 » Wed Apr 04, 2012 1:33 am

I think they all look great IMO :D
John

brothers
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Post by brothers » Wed Apr 04, 2012 5:00 am

Fido, what a treasure. Thanks for the photos. I'm impressed by the information that Kent provided regarding this brush's history.
Gary

SOTD 99%: 12 soaps & creams, SilkSmoke synthetic, General V2 by Colonial razors, Kai & Schick, Superior 70 aftershave splash + menthol + 444 asb

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churchilllafemme
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Post by churchilllafemme » Wed Apr 04, 2012 8:52 am

Very nice. It looks like a Persian Jar shape with a collar. Are you going to use it?
_______
John

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malocchio
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kent magic

Post by malocchio » Wed Apr 04, 2012 9:29 am

these are certainly heirloom treasures of immense beauty...very interesting info from Kent !!

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Fido
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Post by Fido » Wed Apr 04, 2012 9:47 am

churchilllafemme wrote:Very nice. It looks like a Persian Jar shape with a collar. Are you going to use it?
No. It just wouldn't seem right. I and perhaps others to come will be able to just enjoy the pleasure of ownership of a little piece of history.

Perhaps if I make it to 2019 .......

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KAV
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Post by KAV » Wed Apr 04, 2012 11:05 am

A elephant and a badger-two badgers gave their all for that brush. It would be a greater sin NOT to use it.

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Squire
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Post by Squire » Wed Apr 04, 2012 11:15 am

Oh I'd use it, daily.
Regards,
Squire

John N.
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Post by John N. » Wed Apr 04, 2012 11:23 am

KAV wrote:A elephant and a badger-two badgers gave their all for that brush. It would be a greater sin NOT to use it.
Agreed.

A side note: In 1971 (or so) I purchased a new Kent brush that looked identical to the V16 except perhaps with a smaller knot...around 25mm. Over the years the handle took a beating and also turned a lovely butterscotch color. In 2010 I had the brush rebuilt by Mt. Tam Woodworks, and the original knot now resides in a beautiful cocobolo handle of the same shape as the original. It is a favored part of my limited rotation.
J.
John N.

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M6Classic
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Post by M6Classic » Wed Apr 04, 2012 11:33 am

I own and have used a Chubby 3 with an elephant ivory handle. While the ivories are certainly luxurious and have a wonderful feel and special heft in the hand, I actually do not prefer ivory over modern resins and plexiglass. The ivory inevitably will crack...its supposed to...and may prove difficult to clean. God knows how you'll feel the first time it slips from your hand and slams against a tile wall.

I prefer the feel of a resin Chubby 3 over the ivory; it is better balanced and has more of what I consider the "right weight." Also, modern materials have a coefficient of expansion closer to ivory than did bakelite or other early man-made plastcs, so the knot will stay secure for just as long as it would in an ivory handle...perhaps longer, given advances in adhesives. Finally, I don't worry about modern brushes, I just wake up and shave, and I have no concern for customs or the TSA when I travel.

Perhaps there are others among us who can compare ivory handles to man-made material. I don't imagine that my experience and opinion is the norm.

Buzz

LouisIII
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Post by LouisIII » Wed Apr 04, 2012 11:40 am

Buzz,
I quite agree re. natural materials generally (though I don't own any ivory meself). Wood, horn etc are just not great materials for a tool that's going to get wet every day. I certainly do see the appeal of them aesthetically and can't help but covet some of them - but would, like Fido, keep them for the shelf and someday the museum.
~ Infusing the irreducibly quotidian with sensual pleasure ~

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M6Classic
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Post by M6Classic » Wed Apr 04, 2012 1:01 pm

LouisIII wrote:Buzz,
I quite agree re. natural materials generally (though I don't own any ivory meself). Wood, horn etc are just not great materials for a tool that's going to get wet every day. I certainly do see the appeal of them aesthetically and can't help but covet some of them - but would, like Fido, keep them for the shelf and someday the museum.
Don't get me started on horn which is, in my opinion, the worst handle material ever employed! It seems to me that horn was chosen to replace ivory as the "natural material" after the ivory ban...it certainly wasn't chosen for any inherent fine qualities. I don't know enough about wood as a brush handle material to comment.

Buzz

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drP
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Post by drP » Wed Apr 04, 2012 1:10 pm

Beautiful brush.
I would not use it for one single second, let alone for a complete pass... :)
I've not used one of my 8 ivory shaving brushes until now and i won't change my mind about this... 8)

PS: there are two more ivory brushes to join the rest of my stack within the next few weeks. Made in the USA of pre ban elephant ivory... :D
Peter

John N.
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Post by John N. » Wed Apr 04, 2012 2:52 pm

This reminds me a bit of some of the discussions I have seen on Timezone (whether one should dive with a fine and rare mechanical watch...or not). I have always come down on the side of "use it, but with care". I still dive with a Rolex Red Submariner (a big deal for Rolex collectors) but the watch is always serviced in a timely fashion, and I have the piece pressure tested prior to any dive trip. I also PAY ATTENTION to the watch during the dive (try not to bang it on the hard head of my buddy :wink: ). The old watch has given me great joy over the years.
If I had a vintage ivory brush, I would certainly use it and then maintain it with some of that OCD that many of us bring to the table. :shock:
J.
John N.

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Squire
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Post by Squire » Wed Apr 04, 2012 3:09 pm

I have already said I would use it, with care, certainly. I will also drive a vintage vehicle while carrying a vintage watch on my way to a shooting match with an antique target rifle after having shaved that morning with a 100+ year old straight razor. But that's just me.
Regards,
Squire

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M6Classic
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Post by M6Classic » Wed Apr 04, 2012 3:20 pm

Squire wrote:I have already said I would use it, with care, certainly. I will also drive a vintage vehicle while carrying a vintage watch on my way to a shooting match with an antique target rifle after having shaved that morning with a 100+ year old straight razor. But that's just me.
Hey, Squire, did you buy that razor new?

Buzz

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Nitrox
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Post by Nitrox » Wed Apr 04, 2012 3:32 pm

Nice brush. Very elegant looking.
I don't think I would use it either. It hasn't cracked up to now, why take a chance? I have two identical bone brushes with an identical crack on both, even before they were used.
Bruno

"Shhhhhaving cream, be nice and clean
shave every day and you'll always look keen."

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Squire
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Post by Squire » Wed Apr 04, 2012 3:46 pm

It was a gift Buzz.
Regards,
Squire

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KAV
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Post by KAV » Fri Apr 06, 2012 9:01 pm

The problem with horn is simply the grade. The most stable and dense material comes from the tip. But, like kiln dried hickory axe handles you have to chance on luck or examination to get a good one.
During my brief career on a working ranch a belligerent 2 year old Braemer up from old Mexico made war on two vaqueros and killed a horse. I pulled out a Colt New Service in .45 Colt and dropped the beast with a spine shot.
That Colt had lovely yellow ivory grips and worked splendidly. The owner butchered that bull and we had BBQ.Chowing down on that miserable creature bonded those two Vaqueros and myself beyond any other experience.
Not everything utilised from Nature is the evil of human domination. :bull

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