Slantbar question

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Stainless_persona
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Slantbar question

Post by Stainless_persona »

So I keep hearing everywhere that the Slantbar has more exposure at one end because it;s slanted. But I don't think that's true. Both the base, and the top part are twisted so insted of a straight base with a slanted blade it's a blade with a very slight S curve and a matching bar. Therefore, equal blade exposure across the length of it. Maybe somebody can clarify for me.

*NOTE have started using my real name.
Chris
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nteeman
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Post by nteeman »

This issue has been debated to death here before. I suggest you do a search and read the thread(s). :shock:
-Neal (DE user since 1998)
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drmoss_ca
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Post by drmoss_ca »

Hope these help:

Image

Image

There is a slightly wider gap between the blade edge and the safety bar at the 'wider' end, though it is hard to see. The other picture illustrates how there is also a greater protrusion of the blade from underneath the top cap at this end. Sorry for poor quality, this was done with a cobbled together macro set up.

Chris
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Lil' Shaver
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Post by Lil' Shaver »

This is being discussed on another forum right now. Might be worth a look. (Hope this is not against any forum rules to do this)

http://badgerandblade.com/vb/showthread ... post215367
yasuo200365
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Post by yasuo200365 »

Chris,

IMO you're right.

A slantbar (razors other than Merkur's slant exist) just twists ever so slightly the blade & the geometry of the bar & cap should compensate so the exposure needn't vary.

However, if you put a blade into a Merkur it does vary whereas in an Apollo (they probably patented the Slant design) it doesn't. Merkur haven't got their geometry quite right, they're ever so slightly out.

The thing to remember though is that a slant is only mimicking good shaving technique i.e. moving the head of the razor diagonally - an analogy is the fixed slant of the blade on a snow plough.

Regards
John
yasuo200365
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Post by yasuo200365 »

The snow plough analogy may not be clear so check out this page - about halfway down is a picture from an old Gillette instruction on 'How to Shave'.

http://www.shavemyface.com/forum/viewto ... highlight=

Regards
John
Stainless_persona
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Post by Stainless_persona »

yes, in a perfect world I would be right, and I wish I was. But realistically it's probably very difficult to create an exact twist in the metal. It was a thread in B&B I read that inspired the question, but I;m only a member here so I needed an outlet. Thanks for the pics other Chris.
Chris
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Pauldog
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Post by Pauldog »

My understanding is that the purpose of the slant is to cut the hair at an angle, similar to cutting with a guillotine rather than an axe. The small difference in exposure is unintentional.
yasuo200365
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Post by yasuo200365 »

Stainless_persona wrote:realistically it's probably very difficult to create an exact twist in the metal.
I don't see why it's difficult? DE blade are made to an exact specification - the holes are always in the same place, their dimensions are always the same.

Regards
John
Stainless_persona
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Post by Stainless_persona »

really it shouldn't be difficult, we (humans) can engineer an automatic transmission, or a space craft. How difficult would it be to create a template with the proper curvature. Must just not be worth it for merkur.
Chris
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giraffejumper
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Post by giraffejumper »

........we (humans) can engineer an automatic transmission, or a space craft. How difficult would it be to create a template with the proper curvature. Must just not be worth it for merkur.
Yes. And our cars break down and our space ships don't always make it!
But we are getting better!
Check out how accurately the lasers cut out the molds in this Japanese video!: http://tvinjapan.com/blog/2007/04/13/am ... -included/
If some company could make a razor as accurately laser cut as these toys - it would be almost perfect!
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