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What are you reading?

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Postby notthesharpest » Fri Nov 05, 2010 10:54 am

I've been bravely trying to understand some of what Northrop Frye has to say in The Great Code - it's billed as a study of the Bible and literature, and turns out in my opinion as a really interesting study of the roots of "western literature" and even "western culture" as a whole, and while obviously his treatment is very conscious of the Bible and its huge influence, is not "preachy" or even "religious" in tone. Frye was indeed an ordained minister, but clearly first and foremost a brilliant professor.

Maybe a little too brilliant for me, unfortunately. But I don't think Coles Notes ever got around to this one. :)
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Postby jww » Fri Nov 05, 2010 11:10 am

GA Russell wrote:...

I am finding The Ninth Directive to be so delicious that I don't want to read it for more than a half hour at a time!


This is how I felt about most of the Ludlum books I have read -- especially the Bourne Identity -- just could not put that one down. I have often ogled Quiller books, but never made the jump -- sounds like something I would enjoy. Onto the list the go.
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Postby wenestvedt » Fri Nov 05, 2010 1:19 pm

I just got a review copy of the new translation of "303 Squadron" about the daring Polish pilots of the RAF during the Battle of Britain. Tons of photos, and the tone of the text is very much of its time (1940). Loving it so far.
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Postby fallingwickets » Fri Nov 05, 2010 2:19 pm

is that fiedler or king, Will?

thanks

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Postby paddy » Fri Nov 05, 2010 2:41 pm

I am off on vacation for the next 2 weeks. Have a few books to read:

The autobiography of Lauren Fignon (pro cyclist) - When we were young and carefree

Great Expectations - Charles Dickens - always wanted to read this - finally getting round to it.

Ernest Hemingway - For whom the bell tolls - again never read it. it's time i did.

Redcoat - by Richard Holmes - a history book about the British Army during the Crimea War.

most of these will be read on a beach in Egypt, looking out over the Red Sea and with a cold beer in the other hand!
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Postby drmoss_ca » Fri Nov 05, 2010 4:01 pm

Since the Dance to the Music of Time, I have read Hilary Spurling's guide to the novel sequence (Invitation to the Dance), a pre-press version of my brother's edition of my father's war diaries, and am now on Ben Goldacre's Bad Science. Simple, basic and useful to anyone who feels inadequately equipped to evaluate the claims of modern day shamans.

After that, the stack on the back of the bedside table includes a biography of Wellington, a collection of Canadian short stories, a biography of Alexander the Great, The Lost Beauties of the English Language by Charles MacKay, a couple of old novels passed on to me by my Ma, and Forrest and Gross's views on the wedge strategy of the intelligent (tee hee) design movement. Under that are three books about darkroom techniques that I really ought to read before I waste more paper under the variable contrast enlarger. One of them details how to develop b&w film in instant coffee, vitamin C and baking soda. Such things are important to a certain kind of mind.

Excuse me, I have some reading to attend to...

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Postby Straight Arrow » Fri Nov 05, 2010 5:47 pm

Right now it's Travels with Charley by John Steinbeck. It's a wonderful account of Steinbeck's trip with his dog, Charley, traveling throughout the US in a pickup truck fitted with a tiny house. I love his writing style...a concise prose using an economy of words that in their simplicity are capable of great strength.
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Postby Squire » Fri Nov 05, 2010 7:46 pm

And the truck was named?
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Postby jthomas60506 » Fri Nov 05, 2010 8:06 pm

ThePossum wrote:
jthomas60506 wrote:Bonhoeffer by Eric Metaxas
The Blooming of a Lotus by Thich Nhat Hanh


Would love to hear your impressions of Metaxas book. Sounds like interesting reading both from a historical stand point and to maybe get into Bonhoeffer's head a bit. Have read Bonhoeffer's "Cost of Discipleship" and found it very interesting as well as inspirational.


I'd say that the book does both quite well. Much of the book deals with Bonhoeffer's development as an intellectual and a theologian. It details many of the tensions and seminal events that formed his faith (one of which was his first trip to America and a visit to an African American church in Harlem.)

As you come to appreciate his faith, you realize that he probably could not have acted any differently in his opposition to Hitler and, ultimately, in his complicity in the plot to kill him.

Much of what Metaxas presents of Bonhoeffer's imprisonment comes from his correspondence and from the sketchy reflections of a few of his fellow prisoners who survived. It's an inspriring story of faith, but it also reminds of how much more we could be doing with the time we're given.

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Postby Straight Arrow » Fri Nov 05, 2010 8:55 pm

Squire wrote:And the truck was named?


"Rocinante"...after Don Quixote's horse.
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Postby Kyle76 » Sat Nov 06, 2010 7:05 am

Straight Arrow wrote:Right now it's Travels with Charley by John Steinbeck. It's a wonderful account of Steinbeck's trip with his dog, Charley, traveling throughout the US in a pickup truck fitted with a tiny house. I love his writing style...a concise prose using an economy of words that in their simplicity are capable of great strength.


That book has been on my radar for 30 years. I even owned it and read a few pages one time. I think it has gotten away from me, but I need to obtain another copy. Wonder if Steinbeck would use a 40-foot motor home today?
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Postby Squire » Sat Nov 06, 2010 7:14 am

Correct Rich, I think that was a nice touch.
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Postby drmoss_ca » Sat Nov 06, 2010 9:15 am

Should any of our members NOT have read Don Quixote, be not afraid of Edith Grossman's latest translation. As accessible as any, and just as enjoyable. My son read it right through when he was 15, so you can do so too.

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Postby wenestvedt » Sat Nov 06, 2010 6:59 pm

Clive, it's the Arkady Feidler one, but they had it newly retranslated. I am really enjoying it so far!

- Will
P.S. I read Don Quixote. That book was a sharp disappointment.
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Postby notthesharpest » Sat Nov 06, 2010 7:30 pm

I started to try to read it thirty years ago, when I still pronounced it Kwik-Sote. I gave up after about two pages. :) I still haven't got around to reading it for real.
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Postby giammi » Sun Nov 07, 2010 2:25 am

Coincidentally I found the "Kite Runner". Didn't even remember that I bought it time ago and read it during my trip to Germany
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Postby giammi » Sun Nov 07, 2010 2:35 am

notthesharpest wrote:I gave up after about two pages.


Reminds me that I asked a Spanish woman about that book as she read it during her studies at the university. She said that it is the most boring book she ever had to read and she would have stopped at page 2 if she were not from Spain.

I haven't read the book, so I can't judge if she was just kidding or not.
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Postby notthesharpest » Sun Nov 07, 2010 7:48 am

giammi wrote:
notthesharpest wrote:I gave up after about two pages.


Reminds me that I asked a Spanish woman about that book as she read it during her studies at the university. She said that it is the most boring book she ever had to read and she would have stopped at page 2 if she were not from Spain.

I haven't read the book, so I can't judge if she was just kidding or not.
Thirty years ago, I was eleven years old, so I had two excuses - not from Spain and not smart enough either. :)
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Postby Ken » Mon Nov 08, 2010 10:01 pm

drmoss_ca wrote:Should any of our members NOT have read Don Quixote, be not afraid of Edith Grossman's latest translation. As accessible as any, and just as enjoyable. My son read it right through when he was 15, so you can do so too.

Chris


I recently read an interesting book on translation by Edith Grossman, entitled "Why Translation Matters." (Yale 2010)

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Postby drumana » Thu Nov 11, 2010 8:32 am

Straight Arrow wrote:Right now it's Travels with Charley by John Steinbeck. It's a wonderful account of Steinbeck's trip with his dog, Charley, traveling throughout the US in a pickup truck fitted with a tiny house. I love his writing style...a concise prose using an economy of words that in their simplicity are capable of great strength.


Great book, as is any by Steinbeck. A few years back I didn't have TV and read a bunch of classics including almost everything by Steinbeck. Good stuff, albeit a tad depressing sometimes. "Travels with Charley" is unique among his library. Very nice read.

Currently, I'm reading "The Road" by Cormac McCarthy. It's rather dark, but good.

I'm also re-reading one of my favorite books, "The Glass Bead Game" by Herman Hesse (one of my favorite authors), and a Joseph Campbell book called "The Art of Living".
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